NWA Movie

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  • GaryGary 3,982 Posts
    I enjoyed the movie. 2.5 hours is a long time for me to sit through a movie, but I liked it.

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    batmon said:
    GamleOle said:
    I haven't watched it yet, but from what I have heard so far, it is not entirely truthful. It seems that they wanted Dre to look like a gangster who stood up to Suge and beat up blood gang members. That almost certainly didn't happen. Dre was not into the gang stuff, and when Death Row was flooded with gang members around 95/96, Dre would stay at home and rarely go the the studio. I also hear that there is a scene where Dre tells Suge to his face that he is leaving the label. That's also something I doubt. In reality, it seems that Dre ran off and almost had to hide himself. When Suge couldn't get his hands on Dre after he had ditched Death Row, he invited Sam Sneed for a meeting where Sam Sneed was beat up pretty badly because of his affiliation with Dre. Although he would have red and blue in his videos, everyone says that Dre wasn't about that lifestyle, and that this was part of the reason why he left Death Row. The fact that Dre never responded to any of Suge's insults also makes it hard to believe that Dre Stood up against Suge the way he supposedly does in the movie:

    To be fair, Dre had no problem w/ the gangsta shit when Suge got him out of eazy & hellers contract.

    [strong]But Dre had nothing to do with that situation.[/strong] That was something that Suge and his crew took care of. Everyone (even those who are cool with Dre and respect him, like Snoop or DJ Quik) has said that Dre didn't like to be around or part of the the gang stuff. In the early years of Death Row, people weren't generally allowed to bring their friends to the studio, but when that changed around 1995/1996, and Death Row was full of gang members, Dre would stay away and work at his own house. Back in the days, everyone was scared of Suge because he had such a big (and violent) crew to support him. I seriously doubt that Dre ever stood up to them. Just after Dre had left Death Row, he also tried to distance and disasscociate himself from gangster rap, but when he didn't have any succes with his new style, he went back to doing gangster rap and did 2001.

    Yet he signed on to Death Row.
    Why didnt he just leave if he wasnt "down" w/ that stuff?
    He didnt know Suge was gonna shakedown Eazy?
    What does Dee Barnes think?


  • GamleOleGamleOle 508 Posts
    batmon said:
    GamleOle said:
    I haven't watched it yet, but from what I have heard so far, it is not entirely truthful. It seems that they wanted Dre to look like a gangster who stood up to Suge and beat up blood gang members. That almost certainly didn't happen. Dre was not into the gang stuff, and when Death Row was flooded with gang members around 95/96, Dre would stay at home and rarely go the the studio. I also hear that there is a scene where Dre tells Suge to his face that he is leaving the label. That's also something I doubt. In reality, it seems that Dre ran off and almost had to hide himself. When Suge couldn't get his hands on Dre after he had ditched Death Row, he invited Sam Sneed for a meeting where Sam Sneed was beat up pretty badly because of his affiliation with Dre. Although he would have red and blue in his videos, everyone says that Dre wasn't about that lifestyle, and that this was part of the reason why he left Death Row. The fact that Dre never responded to any of Suge's insults also makes it hard to believe that Dre Stood up against Suge the way he supposedly does in the movie:

    To be fair, Dre had no problem w/ the gangsta shit when Suge got him out of eazy & hellers contract.

    [strong]But Dre had nothing to do with that situation.[/strong] That was something that Suge and his crew took care of. Everyone (even those who are cool with Dre and respect him, like Snoop or DJ Quik) has said that Dre didn't like to be around or part of the the gang stuff. In the early years of Death Row, people weren't generally allowed to bring their friends to the studio, but when that changed around 1995/1996, and Death Row was full of gang members, Dre would stay away and work at his own house. Back in the days, everyone was scared of Suge because he had such a big (and violent) crew to support him. I seriously doubt that Dre ever stood up to them. Just after Dre had left Death Row, he also tried to distance and disasscociate himself from gangster rap, but when he didn't have any succes with his new style, he went back to doing gangster rap and did 2001.

    Yet he signed on to Death Row.
    Why didnt he just leave if he wasnt "down" w/ that stuff?
    He didnt know Suge was gonna shakedown Eazy?
    What does Dee Barnes think?


    He might have beat up a woman, he might have been okay with Suge confronting Eazy E, and he might have signed to Death Row and released gangster rap that included references to bloods and crips. But that still doesn't mean that he was into it. Unlike Snoop, the Dogg Pound, 2pac, DJ Quik, Nate Dogg, Oftb and a lot of other Death Row artists, Dre was never affiliated with any gang. In the early days, when Dre produced The Chronic and Doggystyle, the atmosphere at Death Row was a lot more peaceful because it was almost only the artists who were allowed in the studio. Around 95, when people were allowed to bring their friends, and gang members started coming through, the atmosphere changed, and that's when all the violence and beatdowns took place at the studio. A lot of people has said that Dre wasn't really comfortable around gang members and the atmosphere at DR towards the end.



  • DawhudDawhud 213 Posts
    Everybody talking about Eazy-E's White Sox hat, but nobody said anything about Dre wearing 94 metal plate Karl Kani in 1989.

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    batmon said:
    GamleOle said:
    I haven't watched it yet, but from what I have heard so far, it is not entirely truthful. It seems that they wanted Dre to look like a gangster who stood up to Suge and beat up blood gang members. That almost certainly didn't happen. Dre was not into the gang stuff, and when Death Row was flooded with gang members around 95/96, Dre would stay at home and rarely go the the studio. I also hear that there is a scene where Dre tells Suge to his face that he is leaving the label. That's also something I doubt. In reality, it seems that Dre ran off and almost had to hide himself. When Suge couldn't get his hands on Dre after he had ditched Death Row, he invited Sam Sneed for a meeting where Sam Sneed was beat up pretty badly because of his affiliation with Dre. Although he would have red and blue in his videos, everyone says that Dre wasn't about that lifestyle, and that this was part of the reason why he left Death Row. The fact that Dre never responded to any of Suge's insults also makes it hard to believe that Dre Stood up against Suge the way he supposedly does in the movie:

    To be fair, Dre had no problem w/ the gangsta shit when Suge got him out of eazy & hellers contract.

    [strong]But Dre had nothing to do with that situation.[/strong] That was something that Suge and his crew took care of. Everyone (even those who are cool with Dre and respect him, like Snoop or DJ Quik) has said that Dre didn't like to be around or part of the the gang stuff. In the early years of Death Row, people weren't generally allowed to bring their friends to the studio, but when that changed around 1995/1996, and Death Row was full of gang members, Dre would stay away and work at his own house. Back in the days, everyone was scared of Suge because he had such a big (and violent) crew to support him. I seriously doubt that Dre ever stood up to them. Just after Dre had left Death Row, he also tried to distance and disasscociate himself from gangster rap, but when he didn't have any succes with his new style, he went back to doing gangster rap and did 2001.

    Yet he signed on to Death Row.
    Why didnt he just leave if he wasnt "down" w/ that stuff?
    He didnt know Suge was gonna shakedown Eazy?
    What does Dee Barnes think?


    [strong]He might have beat up a woman[/strong], he might have been okay with Suge confronting Eazy E, and he might have signed to Death Row and released gangster rap that included references to bloods and crips. But that still doesn't mean that he was into it. Unlike Snoop, the Dogg Pound, 2pac, DJ Quik, Nate Dogg, Oftb and a lot of other Death Row artists, Dre was never affiliated with any gang. In the early days, when Dre produced The Chronic and Doggystyle, the atmosphere at Death Row was a lot more peaceful because it was almost only the artists who were allowed in the studio. Around 95, when people were allowed to bring their friends, and gang members started coming through, the atmosphere changed, and that's when all the violence and beatdowns took place at the studio. A lot of people has said that Dre wasn't really comfortable around gang members and the atmosphere at DR towards the end.




    Wow....

    He doesnt have to be a gang member.
    Your seeing this dude thru rose-tinted glasses like he was some studio nerd that didnt get involved w/ questionable shit.
    He just apologized for his abuse against women(plural). The Dee Barnes shit was before Death Row.

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    The retrospective look at Dre's entire career seems to be a case of him being into and even succeeding at things that he wasn't really into. He wasn't into wearing make-up and funny suits, but there are the Wrecking Crew photos. One minute, it'll give a brother brain damage, the next it's The Chronic. He's not into violence ala gangbangers until Dee Barnes pisses him off. And by his liberal utilization of ghost-producers, he hasn't even been into half of the work he's done since The Chronic that he ultimately gets credit for. Dude definitely has a weird story. And just to throw it out there, no thank you again for inflicting the garbation known as Eminem upon us.

  • Fred_GarvinFred_Garvin The land of wind and ghosts 337 Posts
    HarveyCanal said:
    The retrospective look at Dre's entire career seems to be a case of him being into and even succeeding at things that he wasn't really into. He wasn't into wearing make-up and funny suits, but there are the Wrecking Crew photos. One minute, it'll give a brother brain damage, the next it's The Chronic. He's not into violence ala gangbangers until Dee Barnes pisses him off. And by his liberal utilization of ghost-producers, he hasn't even been into half of the work he's done since The Chronic that he ultimately gets credit for. Dude definitely has a weird story. And just to throw it out there, no thank you again for inflicting the garbation known as Eminem upon us.

    And of course, he didn't want to be around gangsters... although his go-to rapper was a guy with gang affiliation. No problem with gangsters when they keep the checks coming, I guess.

  • GamleOleGamleOle 508 Posts
    batmon said:
    GamleOle said:
    I haven't watched it yet, but from what I have heard so far, it is not entirely truthful. It seems that they wanted Dre to look like a gangster who stood up to Suge and beat up blood gang members. That almost certainly didn't happen. Dre was not into the gang stuff, and when Death Row was flooded with gang members around 95/96, Dre would stay at home and rarely go the the studio. I also hear that there is a scene where Dre tells Suge to his face that he is leaving the label. That's also something I doubt. In reality, it seems that Dre ran off and almost had to hide himself. When Suge couldn't get his hands on Dre after he had ditched Death Row, he invited Sam Sneed for a meeting where Sam Sneed was beat up pretty badly because of his affiliation with Dre. Although he would have red and blue in his videos, everyone says that Dre wasn't about that lifestyle, and that this was part of the reason why he left Death Row. The fact that Dre never responded to any of Suge's insults also makes it hard to believe that Dre Stood up against Suge the way he supposedly does in the movie:

    To be fair, Dre had no problem w/ the gangsta shit when Suge got him out of eazy & hellers contract.

    [strong]But Dre had nothing to do with that situation.[/strong] That was something that Suge and his crew took care of. Everyone (even those who are cool with Dre and respect him, like Snoop or DJ Quik) has said that Dre didn't like to be around or part of the the gang stuff. In the early years of Death Row, people weren't generally allowed to bring their friends to the studio, but when that changed around 1995/1996, and Death Row was full of gang members, Dre would stay away and work at his own house. Back in the days, everyone was scared of Suge because he had such a big (and violent) crew to support him. I seriously doubt that Dre ever stood up to them. Just after Dre had left Death Row, he also tried to distance and disasscociate himself from gangster rap, but when he didn't have any succes with his new style, he went back to doing gangster rap and did 2001.

    Yet he signed on to Death Row.
    Why didnt he just leave if he wasnt "down" w/ that stuff?
    He didnt know Suge was gonna shakedown Eazy?
    What does Dee Barnes think?


    [strong]He might have beat up a woman[/strong], he might have been okay with Suge confronting Eazy E, and he might have signed to Death Row and released gangster rap that included references to bloods and crips. But that still doesn't mean that he was into it. Unlike Snoop, the Dogg Pound, 2pac, DJ Quik, Nate Dogg, Oftb and a lot of other Death Row artists, Dre was never affiliated with any gang. In the early days, when Dre produced The Chronic and Doggystyle, the atmosphere at Death Row was a lot more peaceful because it was almost only the artists who were allowed in the studio. Around 95, when people were allowed to bring their friends, and gang members started coming through, the atmosphere changed, and that's when all the violence and beatdowns took place at the studio. A lot of people has said that Dre wasn't really comfortable around gang members and the atmosphere at DR towards the end.




    Wow....

    He doesnt have to be a gang member.
    Your seeing this dude thru rose-tinted glasses like he was some studio nerd that didnt get involved w/ questionable shit.
    He just apologized for his abuse against women(plural). The Dee Barnes shit was before Death Row.

    A lot of people have confirmed what OFTB are saying in the clip below. When Dre is standing up against Suge and beating down blood gang members in the NWA movie, it just doesn't seem to correspond with how things actually went down, and how Dre actually was like. They made him look like a gangster when he really wasn't.


  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    batmon said:
    GamleOle said:
    I haven't watched it yet, but from what I have heard so far, it is not entirely truthful. It seems that they wanted Dre to look like a gangster who stood up to Suge and beat up blood gang members. That almost certainly didn't happen. Dre was not into the gang stuff, and when Death Row was flooded with gang members around 95/96, Dre would stay at home and rarely go the the studio. I also hear that there is a scene where Dre tells Suge to his face that he is leaving the label. That's also something I doubt. In reality, it seems that Dre ran off and almost had to hide himself. When Suge couldn't get his hands on Dre after he had ditched Death Row, he invited Sam Sneed for a meeting where Sam Sneed was beat up pretty badly because of his affiliation with Dre. Although he would have red and blue in his videos, everyone says that Dre wasn't about that lifestyle, and that this was part of the reason why he left Death Row. The fact that Dre never responded to any of Suge's insults also makes it hard to believe that Dre Stood up against Suge the way he supposedly does in the movie:

    To be fair, Dre had no problem w/ the gangsta shit when Suge got him out of eazy & hellers contract.

    [strong]But Dre had nothing to do with that situation.[/strong] That was something that Suge and his crew took care of. Everyone (even those who are cool with Dre and respect him, like Snoop or DJ Quik) has said that Dre didn't like to be around or part of the the gang stuff. In the early years of Death Row, people weren't generally allowed to bring their friends to the studio, but when that changed around 1995/1996, and Death Row was full of gang members, Dre would stay away and work at his own house. Back in the days, everyone was scared of Suge because he had such a big (and violent) crew to support him. I seriously doubt that Dre ever stood up to them. Just after Dre had left Death Row, he also tried to distance and disasscociate himself from gangster rap, but when he didn't have any succes with his new style, he went back to doing gangster rap and did 2001.

    Yet he signed on to Death Row.
    Why didnt he just leave if he wasnt "down" w/ that stuff?
    He didnt know Suge was gonna shakedown Eazy?
    What does Dee Barnes think?


    [strong]He might have beat up a woman[/strong], he might have been okay with Suge confronting Eazy E, and he might have signed to Death Row and released gangster rap that included references to bloods and crips. But that still doesn't mean that he was into it. Unlike Snoop, the Dogg Pound, 2pac, DJ Quik, Nate Dogg, Oftb and a lot of other Death Row artists, Dre was never affiliated with any gang. In the early days, when Dre produced The Chronic and Doggystyle, the atmosphere at Death Row was a lot more peaceful because it was almost only the artists who were allowed in the studio. Around 95, when people were allowed to bring their friends, and gang members started coming through, the atmosphere changed, and that's when all the violence and beatdowns took place at the studio. A lot of people has said that Dre wasn't really comfortable around gang members and the atmosphere at DR towards the end.




    Wow....

    He doesnt have to be a gang member.
    Your seeing this dude thru rose-tinted glasses like he was some studio nerd that didnt get involved w/ questionable shit.
    He just apologized for his abuse against women(plural). The Dee Barnes shit was before Death Row.

    A lot of people have confirmed what OFTB are saying in the clip below. When Dre is standing up against Suge and beating down blood gang members in the NWA movie, it just doesn't seem to correspond with how things actually went down, and how Dre actually was like. They made him look like a gangster when he really wasn't.


    Dude, one can be involved in some gangster shit and not be a gangster or a banger. No one is claming he's one.

    If you let a drug dealer fund your project, thats involvement.

  • 1. I don't think dude is trying to say Dre was a wholesome cat, just that the movie is inflating his gangsterism

    2. I do think he's suggesting that Dre is somehow less real or less thorough because he didn't bang, which is weird

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    JonnyPaycheck said:
    1. I don't think dude is trying to say Dre was a wholesome cat, just that the movie is inflating his gangsterism

    2. I do think he's suggesting that Dre is somehow less real or less thorough because he didn't bang, which is weird

    I haven't watched it yet, but from what I have heard so far, it is not entirely truthful.
    It seems that they wanted Dre to look like a gangster who stood up to Suge and beat up blood gang members.

    I dont recall Dre beating up Bloods in the film. There was the studio scene, but it wasnt some inflated Gangster shit.

    Sending off his baby mother+baby, who had all her shit packed in the car, was some gangster shit!

  • GamleOleGamleOle 508 Posts
    batmon said:
    JonnyPaycheck said:
    1. I don't think dude is trying to say Dre was a wholesome cat, just that the movie is inflating his gangsterism

    2. I do think he's suggesting that Dre is somehow less real or less thorough because he didn't bang, which is weird

    I haven't watched it yet, but from what I have heard so far, it is not entirely truthful.
    It seems that they wanted Dre to look like a gangster who stood up to Suge and beat up blood gang members.

    I dont recall Dre beating up Bloods in the film. There was the studio scene, but it wasnt some inflated Gangster shit.

    Sending off his baby mother+baby, who had all her shit packed in the car, was some gangster shit!

    Ok, I will have to watch the movie before I can comment more on this then.

  • GamleOleGamleOle 508 Posts
    JonnyPaycheck said:
    1. I don't think dude is trying to say Dre was a wholesome cat, just that the movie is inflating his gangsterism

    2. I do think he's suggesting that Dre is somehow less real or less thorough because he didn't bang, which is weird

    It really depends what you mean by real. If you mean a real gangster, then he probably was less real. It seems that he mainly got into it because of the music, and that he didn't actually feel comfortable in that environment. He projected a gangster image but probably didn't live up to it to the same extent that many other artists on Death Row did. It seems that he mainly built that image because of the music. He also tried to turn away from it and only returned to it because that's how he was able to sell records. If there is indeed a scene where Dre punches or beats up a blood or a one where he stands up verbally against Suge, then that seems contrary to how things actually went down.

    I'm not trying to say that Dre is a total fraud, but like you point out, I do think they should be careful of how much of a gangster they portray him as.

  • LaserWolfLaserWolf Portland Oregon 11,518 Posts
    I hate rappers who mainly got into it because of the music.

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    JonnyPaycheck said:
    1. I don't think dude is trying to say Dre was a wholesome cat, just that the movie is inflating his gangsterism

    2. I do think he's suggesting that Dre is somehow less real or less thorough because he didn't bang, which is weird

    It really depends what you mean by real. If you mean a real gangster, then he probably was less real. It seems that he mainly got into it because of the music, and that he didn't actually feel comfortable in that environment. He projected a gangster image but probably didn't live up to it to the same extent that many other artists on Death Row did. It seems that he mainly built that image because of the music. He also tried to turn away from it and only returned to it because that's how he was able to sell records. If there is indeed a scene where Dre punches or beats up a blood or a one where he stands up verbally against Suge, then that seems contrary to how things actually went down.

    I'm not trying to say that Dre is a total fraud, but like you point out, I do think they should be careful of how much of a gangster [strong]they[/strong] portray him as.

    I dont recall any scenes where any of the members did some side-banging between studio time. Brandishing guns isnt a big deal.
    There was drama and common tension, but no one is killin' on the side in this film.

    And remember "they" is Cube & Dre.

  • ThermosThermos 307 Posts

    What does Dee Barnes think?

    She wrote two essays for Gawker on the movie, the first one sparked an apology from Dr Dre. The second one is Barnes' response to the apology:

    http://gawker.com/heres-whats-missing-from-straight-outta-compton-me-and-1724735910
    http://gawker.com/this-is-bigger-than-me-and-bigger-than-hip-hop-dee-b-1726114418

    That first one there should be required reading for anyone that sees Straight Out Of Compton. I think the erasure of Dre's history of domestic violence is a much bigger deal than whether or not he stood up to Suge Knight in some hypermasculine way.

  • GaryGary 3,982 Posts
    I called dre last night. He says yall are bitches. He keeps it pretty real.

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    Thermos said:

    What does Dee Barnes think?

    She wrote two essays for Gawker on the movie, the first one sparked an apology from Dr Dre. The second one is Barnes' response to the apology:

    http://gawker.com/heres-whats-missing-from-straight-outta-compton-me-and-1724735910
    http://gawker.com/this-is-bigger-than-me-and-bigger-than-hip-hop-dee-b-1726114418

    That first one there should be required reading for anyone that sees Straight Out Of Compton. I think the erasure of Dre's history of domestic violence is a much bigger deal than whether or not he stood up to Suge Knight in some hypermasculine way.

    I disagree. The Suge thing was related to NWA and his release from the label and music making. The Dee Barnes incident to me isn't integral to the groups story within the two hours that had. If it was the Dre story then I'd highlight that shit. And again he produced the shit so let's not fool ourselves.

  • JimsterJimster Twilight Zone/ Al Capone/ Rolling Stone/ Eva Perón 6,242 Posts
    Gary said:
    I called dre last night. He says yall are bitches. He keeps it pretty real.

    I had forgotten about him.


  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    Saw the movie 2 nights ago in the same Galaxy Highland Theater where I saw Menace II Society back in '93.

    Loved the scenes of Dre deejaying rough cuts of future NWA tracks. Really, the whole ascent section of the movie was great, while the descent section dragged on a bit much.

    Anyway, I definitely caught the nostalgic vibe and the result is that I now can't seem to stop listening to this song:


  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,367 Posts
    HarveyCanal said:

    Really, the whole ascent section of the movie was great, while the descent section dragged on a bit much.

    Agree. I really liked how it gave a different perspective on who they were/are, not just their entertainer personas (personae?). I also really didn't know much about who jerry heller actually was when i was a kid. He was like a wrestling villain or something.

    But: http://www.avclub.com/article/straight-outta-comptons-writer-meeting-suge-knight-224696

    The producers (incl NWA and fam) controlled the story elements, and seems like stuff was knowingly fictionalized to portray them as they wanted to be portrayed.

    LS: But the movie that you see is the movie Ice Cube and Dr. Dre wanted to tell, which is largely based in fact. The nuance of the story, how people meet one another—they can change that for dramatic purposes. The primary goal of the studio is to create the most commercially viable product.

    AVC: What’s fascinating is that most biopics are not spearheaded by the subject(s) of the movie.

    LS: Yes, this is made by characters in the film, so you’re going to get, as Dre said many times, “his legacy.” That’s his primary concern: the way he appears.

    So I'm disappointed that it's not more of a docu-drama... it's still hard to really know what they're all really like as real, real people. Like, the abuse stuff is really fundamental to understanding Dre as a social person. Not to say that he hasn't changed, and I totally buy that he has. But it's relevant (and popularly interesting in 2015).

    This is the (outsider) writer on the matter:

    AVC: Did your drafts include the general misogyny of the group?

    LS: I didn’t put Dee Barnes in there to demonize Dre, and I’m sure that’s the way it was perceived. I put it in there because that showed the growing influence of Suge Knight on Dr. Dre. You don’t create this music and be the Patron Saint Of Goodness. You just don’t. You don’t sing a song like “Fuck The Police” and not have a level of anger. And you don’t come from a broken home, like he did, and emerge from that without some attachments to the things that happened in the ghetto. This is what goes on in the inner city. There’s anger. There’s the question of, “How do I get out?” There is violence against women. It’s not good, but it exists.

    Bomb Squad scene was crucial for me.

    HarveyCanal said:

    Anyway, I definitely caught the nostalgic vibe and the result is that I now can't seem to stop listening to this song:


    Yeah, that's one of the nicest things he ever rapped over. Great f'ing storytelling too. "19-91, Tony Montana"

  • OkemOkem 4,617 Posts
    Yer, I got bored at around the halfway mark when it drifted into a standard music biopic by the numbers. Probably would've been much more engrossing if they'd picked a smaller timeline and gone into more detail, instead of the obvious 'this is my legacy' reacharound it got to by the end. It was interesting and well acted, but as a piece of cinema or just storytelling it was kinda garbage.

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,367 Posts
    Okem said:
    obvious 'this is my legacy' reacharound

    :oh_my:
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