Where's the place to move internationally?

GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts
edited July 2015 in Strut Central
Not planning on going anywhere but wonder what the recommendation would be.

I'm in the US, but I know a lot of the Strutters are either from abroad or live abroad.

Where's the spot?

Seems like everywhere else has numerous downsides. Much of the part of Europe that doesn't top out at 65 degrees temperature is falling apart economically it seems and unemployment is sky high. Places south, like Brazil, seem to have other issues like crazy crime. Asia seems to be doing better but locations that are more welcoming to foreigners seem to be crazy expensive and the other areas not so much, plus, at least for someone from the US, the cultural differences seem to be large.

Then you've got other mainstays like Canada; pretty similar to the US but just cold (see Europe). Or Mexico - see violence.

Or Island nations and territories - great weather, but limited employment and high cost of living.

I'm sure these are all generalizations and of course the US itself has its own downsides.

What are your experiences traveling or where you're from? What would you suggest? What are the pros and cons of where you are or have been?
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  Comments


  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,225 Posts

    No, no work in Barcelona.















    :lol:

  • mickalphabetmickalphabet deep inna majestic segue 372 Posts
    no, no water in sao paulo









  • OkemOkem 4,617 Posts
    I hear Greece is nice this time of year..

  • mickalphabetmickalphabet deep inna majestic segue 372 Posts
    Dublin tbh, so hott right now with the internazionalles.


  • ppadilhappadilha 1,929 Posts
    crime and violence in places like Brazil and Mexico are only issues if you're in a certain social class and in certain areas - basically if you're poor and in areas that are in the clutches of organized crime. The downside is that you're then living in an island of prosperity where things are more expensive and most people have no connection to reality.

    Southern Europe still seems nice to me. Maybe Berlin? It gets cold there but I don't think it gets any colder than parts of the northern US.

    and if you want a taste of living in a different country without leaving the US, go somewhere like New Orleans or NYC. When I lived in NYC I could go for days without really interacting with Americans.

  • BeatsoupBeatsoup 510 Posts
    Seems like New Zealand is the place to be. Wealthy elites are preparing for a coming collapse. Greece is writing on the wall for where we are headed. Unsustainable system.. Wonder if an average person could afford it in New Zealand..

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2931325/Super-rich-buying-property-New-Zealand-bolthole-case-west-goes-meltdown.html

  • LaserWolfLaserWolf Portland Oregon 11,518 Posts
    Greece will be fine. We will be fine.

    I'm almost 60 and my whole life people have been preparing for the imminent collapse. I suppose one day they will be right.

  • OkemOkem 4,617 Posts
    Greece seems to be pretty fucked tbh. Their economy is already in as bad a state as the U.S.'s during the Great Depression and things look like they might be about to get worse.

    Several of the other Southern European countries aren't looking too healthy either.

    Scandinavia always comes out top of happiness and quality of life surveys, it seems to be a bit of a socialist heaven (if 'Merimen can get with that). Weather is questionable though for sure.

  • LaserWolfLaserWolf Portland Oregon 11,518 Posts
    No doubt. The Greek economy sucks.
    US got out of the depression by going to war with Germany.

  • Bon VivantBon Vivant The Eye of the Storm 2,018 Posts
    I hear Amsterdam is nice.

  • GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts
    Duderonomy said:

    No, no work in Barcelona.

    :lol:

    Part of the question there - when you hear 24% unemployment in Spain, what does that mean? Are 1 in 4 people across the entire country unemployed? Is it great in Barcelona but different elsewhere?


  • OkemOkem 4,617 Posts
    I imagine it's worse for those outside metropolitan / industrial areas because there's fewer opportunities. I think in Spain, the further South you go, the worse it gets. Anywhere that was reliant on tourism and constant building development off the back of that industry was pretty much fucked by the recession. Also unemployment will generally affect the youth more, for example Greek youth unemployment is at around 50%, but general rate is around 25%.

  • KineticKinetic 3,738 Posts
    Nothing to see here in Sydney.

  • HorseleechHorseleech 3,830 Posts
    Anyone here ever live/work in Hong Kong?

    I lived there mid/late 70s when I was in high school and it was amazing, but I've never been back. I know housing has always been crazy expensive, but pretty much everything else was dirt cheap.

    Wondering what it's like these days.

  • ppadilhappadilha 1,929 Posts
    Horseleech said:
    Anyone here ever live/work in Hong Kong?

    I lived there mid/late 70s when I was in high school and it was amazing, but I've never been back. I know housing has always been crazy expensive, but pretty much everything else was dirt cheap.

    Wondering what it's like these days.

    I only know people who have visited recently (past 5 years or so), everyone says it's amazing.

  • Hong Kong would be spiffy if you don't mind waiting for the inevitable Tienamen-style government crackdown.

  • bassiebassie 11,710 Posts
    The whole “Canada is cold!” thing holds no ground unless you are dispatching from Florida or Phoenix. Aren’t you where it snows?

    Not to mention Canada is a huge land with any number of different climes.
    Nanaimo is nothing like Jasper which is nothing like Nunavut which is nothing like Kenora which is nothing like Toronto which is nothing like Gaspé which is nothing like Cape Breton which is nothing like Gander.

    The similarities to the States have their limit. Many an American who has spent any substantial amount of time here has pondered a move based on the differences.

    Stop messing around and just get to Toronto already.

  • Jonny_PaycheckJonny_Paycheck 17,825 Posts
    6 goddess


    I would move to Berlin. Cheap-ish, vibrant city life, country is fiscally secure... easy to get around Europe...

  • discos_almadiscos_alma discos_alma 2,164 Posts
    I know I've discussed it before on here, but I liked Medellin a lot. It doesn't have much going for it in terms of traditional company jobs but it's outrageously fun, very very cheap and has an ideal climate IMO. There's a solid train system within the city that will set you back about $0.20 per ride with nice modern, air conditioned train cars filled with beautiful women.

  • discos_almadiscos_alma discos_alma 2,164 Posts
    In terms of jobs, Panama City Panama is probably the spot right now in Latin America but it kind of has all of the annoying aspects of Miami condensed into a smaller space. With shittier food. And more Americans. :nagl:

  • parallaxparallax no-style-having mf'er 1,266 Posts
    If not Canada, then a Scandanavian country. All stable, all offer opportunities, all look after their citizens, all have a high quality of life and happiness index.

    The downside is it gets cold, but you dress for it and embrace it. No different than dealing with a heatwave imo.

    If you truly cannot stand any amount of winter/cold weather, then I believe you sacrifice one of opportunity/safety/stability and therefore happiness.

    All depends on what you're after.

    I love Canada and cosign all of what Bassie said...except the moving to Toronto bit.


  • mickalphabetmickalphabet deep inna majestic segue 372 Posts
    Horseleech said:
    Anyone here ever live/work in Hong Kong?

    I lived there mid/late 70s when I was in high school and it was amazing, but I've never been back. I know housing has always been crazy expensive, but pretty much everything else was dirt cheap.

    Wondering what it's like these days.

    I visited some friends working there recently, its got the amazing food, no crime and good wages going for it but i thought it was seriously cramped, tiny apartments in massive blocks squashed onto these tiny islands - i found it really claustrophobic. Saying that i did have an excellent time, fun can be had, found some records and you meet people from all over the place there, if just a bit too many working in finance/banking.

  • GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts
    bassie said:
    The whole “Canada is cold!” thing holds no ground unless you are dispatching from Florida or Phoenix. Aren’t you where it snows?

    Not to mention Canada is a huge land with any number of different climes.
    Nanaimo is nothing like Jasper which is nothing like Nunavut which is nothing like Kenora which is nothing like Toronto which is nothing like Gaspé which is nothing like Cape Breton which is nothing like Gander.

    The similarities to the States have their limit. Many an American who has spent any substantial amount of time here has pondered a move based on the differences.

    Stop messing around and just get to Toronto already.

    I had to go back and double check as I thought many of the Canadian cities peaked in the high 60s or very low 70s during the summer months although it appears I was mistaken. In fact, from a temp perspective it seems to be very close to the Midwest. I'm sold then. I am spoiled on the low cost of living here, though. What's the Canadian equivalent of Columbus or Indianapolis? Cincinnati, Cleveland, Pittsburgh? ;)

    One thing I've wondered about is the functional overlap between the US and Canada. Banking? Medical? Day-to-day junk? If one hops the border, do they have to immediately proceed to TD Bank to open new accounts?

  • GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts
    discos_alma said:
    I know I've discussed it before on here, but I liked Medellin a lot. It doesn't have much going for it in terms of traditional company jobs but it's outrageously fun, very very cheap and has an ideal climate IMO. There's a solid train system within the city that will set you back about $0.20 per ride with nice modern, air conditioned train cars filled with beautiful women.

    Does sound appealing. I will say - and this is going to be hugely stereotypical, and probably will be answered like it was when I mentioned Brazil - crime? I have a couple of friends from Central America, and another friend that was stationed in the military, and their stories make it sound like anyone of means lives in a complex set behind giant concrete walls topped with shards of broken glass. That's probably the equivalent of drawing a conclusion on living in the US based entirely on someone's experience in East St. Louis, but I wonder how much of an issue that would be.

    discos_alma said:
    In terms of jobs, Panama City Panama is probably the spot right now in Latin America but it kind of has all of the annoying aspects of Miami condensed into a smaller space. With shittier food. And more Americans. :nagl:

    More Americans than Miami... hmmm.

  • Big_StacksBig_Stacks "I don't worry about hittin' power, cause I don't give 'em nuttin' to hit." 4,670 Posts
    Hey,

    In my travels, I found Stockholm and Rome to be very lovely cities. I can't say what it might be like to live there, of course. From watching "House Hunters International" on HGTV, I've gathered that housing in Rome is very expensive. Of course, I can imagine winter could get quite cold in Stockholm. Grand Cayman was cool but crazy expensive since they use the British pound as currency (the U.S. dollar to pound exchange rate was a bitch). Konstanz, Germany is a pretty city, and nicely located near Switzerland (Zurich was beautiful, too), Italy, France, and Austria. The only negatives I can say about the place is that the nightlife is lacking, housing can be expensive (so I was told), and it's rainy and damp there fairly regularly. I've had great times in Toronto (big up to your area, Bassie!) and Montreal north of the border. I imagine when I relocate upon retirement, I will probably head somewhere tropical. What's the word on Costa Rica? I've seen it on episodes of "House Hunters International" and it looked like a cool place to dwell. Also, how's Belize as I see those commercials about the place on TV from time to time (and I know nothing about the place).

    Peace,

    Big Stacks from Kakalak

  • What are people's thoughts on mid / south of France?

    You got the weather, it's stable, relaxed, property & land are cheap, the wine, the cheese ...they got records in France right?

  • bassiebassie 11,710 Posts
    G-Writah said:
    bassie said:
    The whole “Canada is cold!” thing holds no ground unless you are dispatching from Florida or Phoenix. Aren’t you where it snows?

    Not to mention Canada is a huge land with any number of different climes.
    Nanaimo is nothing like Jasper which is nothing like Nunavut which is nothing like Kenora which is nothing like Toronto which is nothing like Gaspé which is nothing like Cape Breton which is nothing like Gander.

    The similarities to the States have their limit. Many an American who has spent any substantial amount of time here has pondered a move based on the differences.

    Stop messing around and just get to Toronto already.

    I had to go back and double check as I thought many of the Canadian cities peaked in the high 60s or very low 70s during the summer months although it appears I was mistaken. In fact, from a temp perspective it seems to be very close to the Midwest. I'm sold then. I am spoiled on the low cost of living here, though. What's the Canadian equivalent of Columbus or Indianapolis? Cincinnati, Cleveland, Pittsburgh? ;)

    One thing I've wondered about is the functional overlap between the US and Canada. Banking? Medical? Day-to-day junk? If one hops the border, do they have to immediately proceed to TD Bank to open new accounts?

    Not sure banking will have to change now that everything is online?

    I've only been to Pittsburgh - which I loved. I guess you can say Pittsburgh is like a smaller, American Toronto. I am one of those people who will keep bringing it back to my wonderful city. Straight up - you can make it on the cheap here in almost every aspect but housing.

    Medical will depend on your immigration status. Things recently got very tough for those wanting to immigrate and/or seek citizenship, thanks to the dead-souls right-wing puke of a government presently in power (federal elections this fall). But as a white (I am assuming off the SoulStrut demographics), American professional male - I think you should be OK if you do choose to pursue landed status.

    I'll go by what others have said and that is the biggest adjustment will probably be cultural - and in a good way - depending of course on where in Canada you are. Despite what people think, we're different than Americans here!

    You should visit first.

  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,225 Posts
    Sobriety Won said:
    What are people's thoughts on mid / south of France?

    You got the weather, it's stable, relaxed, property & land are cheap, the wine, the cheese ...they got records in France right?

    They also have French people in France... :nagl:

  • Hey everyone, been back a few years in the South of France after having lived in the UK for over a decade.
    The climate here is quite clement indeed and decent fresh food is still not just a trend. But as far as work and general socialising, I do miss the UK.
    If you can get past the attitude some French people have, then it's quite chilled I reckon..

  • djtopcatdjtopcat Seattle WA The 206 296 Posts
    Any non tourist part of Thailand, housing is dirt cheap,Brit,Aussie and Euro ex-pats all over so you won't feel too out of place. Beautiful beaches,oh and an occasional military coup but you'll get used to it.
    Oh did I mention Thai women and Thai massage for life? Yup that's where I'm retiring, if not Figi.


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