How "live-able" is your hood?

yuichiyuichi Urban sprawl 11,331 Posts
edited February 2015 in Strut Central
Just was ranting on FB about how Los Angeles is quickly losing its appeal on me. Complete gentrification of many areas. Rising living costs due to an influx of wealth. Work commute is bad and will probably get worse. Bad air quality. A general lack of community particularly around my West Los Angeles neighborhood. I know there are many parts of LA too, but I'm talking specifically about getting into your 30s and 40s and looking to raise a family and send your kid to a good school (no wife/kids yet though).

Sure, there's the beach, good schools. But at what cost? I'm guessing the situation is similar in many big cities.

So my question is, How's your HOOD?
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  • yuichi said:
    Complete gentrification of many areas.

    Please elaborate

    b/w

    I don't think Los Angeles has ever been a "cheap" place to live

  • yuichi said:
    So my question is, How's your HOOD?

    Kevin: Yeah, so you know what I'm talking about. There are a lot of Benjamins to be made now with biotech stuff. I don't have to tell you that. How's your portfolio hood?
    Greg: I'd say strong...to quite strong.
    Kevin: You gotta strike while the iron's hot. Now's the time.


    Second tier cities are the way to go now. Detroit, Cleveland, Memphis, Minneapolis. Many amenities but easy on the pocket.

  • RishanRishan 454 Posts
    This is a depressing subject. Ok my immediate surroundings are nice and quiet, right in the middle of the city, fairly good local food and drink options and I'm lucky to be able to afford it. However, the loss of inner city green space, parks and playing fields in the slightly further environs is really sad and very detrimental to human mental health.

    Many hideously ugly modern flat developments going up. My old school selling off sports pitches in the neighbourhood we grew up in. It's like the walls are closing in and crushing the life out of things. I suppose it's the same in every city.

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    Corporate greed is killing Austin by the second. Too much construction. Too much gentrification. And too much replacing Austin people with run-of-the-mill average, mall-shopping Americans. We're not only drowning from pretentious carpetbaggeurs from out of state but now, far too many mouth-breathing Aggies have moved here from in-state. The city government can't wait to have another downtown green space trampled to dust by yet another corporate event. And the cops are far too in our faces over frivolous things. Thankfully, I live in one of the last neighborhoods yet to be gentrified in Austin, but they will soon be converting this barrio to a hipster haven, I'm absolutely sure of it. "Progress" is a bitch.

  • LaserWolfLaserWolf Portland Oregon 11,517 Posts
    How liveable is my hood?
    That is a complex question that only a super computer can answer.
    I found one:
    http://www.areavibes.com/

    My hood scored a 74.


  • LaserWolfLaserWolf Portland Oregon 11,517 Posts
    City of Portland scores a 75, LA 76, Austen 79, Park Slope an 84.

    The lower the score the lower the gentrification me thinks.



  • yuichiyuichi Urban sprawl 11,331 Posts
    TheKindCromang said:
    yuichi said:
    Complete gentrification of many areas.

    Please elaborate

    b/w

    I don't think Los Angeles has ever been a "cheap" place to live

    You're right, it's never been cheap. But how wack it's becoming is astonishing.

    Around my neighborhood, an awful lot of foreign investors are buying up properties all cash, placing their 20 year olds in 'em to have them go to college, and buy them BMWs as well. For long time residents, it's not a pleasant sight. More traffic, higher cost of living, home prices sky-rocketing, so that middle income folk won't be able to buy a home now.

    I read an LA Times article about how developers are creating expensive condos in the Arts District, where actual [em]artists[/em] can not afford to live there anymore.

    Maybe New York is no different, but the types of people that LA seems to attract have a completely skewed idea of what wealth is. Tokyo is absolutely another city you need to be rich to enjoy life.....I would never wanna live there permanently.


  • yuichiyuichi Urban sprawl 11,331 Posts
    HarveyCanal said:
    Corporate greed is killing Austin by the second. Too much construction. Too much gentrification. And too much replacing Austin people with run-of-the-mill average, mall-shopping Americans. We're not only drowning from pretentious carpetbaggeurs from out of state but now, far too many mouth-breathing Aggies have moved here from in-state. The city government can't wait to have another downtown green space trampled to dust by yet another corporate event. And the cops are far too in our faces over frivolous things. Thankfully, I live in one of the last neighborhoods yet to be gentrified in Austin, but they will soon be converting this barrio to a hipster haven, I'm absolutely sure of it. "Progress" is a bitch.

    I've been there for business, and I liked the river and Barton Springs, but I'm definitely hesitant to say it's a place I wanna live.

    Take your pick bra.

    This.


    or my hood.




  • skelskel You can't cheat karma 5,033 Posts
    What's the dynamics between this new influx of Asian n Russian rich kids / bearded hipsters / property speculatin gentrifiers and the old guard block captains and main regulatin mens?

    Serious question.
    I'm guessing the former don't even cross paths with the latter, ever.

  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,787 Posts

    My hood is good. Just moved across town, now beside the Raval (middle-eastern ghetto, great food) and Poble Sec (up-and-coming hipster area). Cost of living is cheaper in Barcelona than in England, and the weather, food, surroundings, women, football, beach, price of booze, and public transport are all brilliant.

  • Rishan said:
    Many hideously ugly modern flat developments going up. My old school selling off sports pitches in the neighbourhood we grew up in. It's like the walls are closing in and crushing the life out of things. I suppose it's the same in every city.

    $1 can buy a house in Detroit - NY Daily News



  • Big_StacksBig_Stacks "I don't worry about hittin' power, cause I don't give 'em nuttin' to hit." 4,670 Posts
    Hey,

    As much as people rip on New Jersey, I like that the state has legislation designed to protect greenspace. Sure, we get crap over suburban sprawl, but central New Jersey has a great quality of life (as evident from a number of cities named to 'top places to live' lists). Beyond our own local offerings (good entertainment, dining, etc.), the proximity to NYC and Philly is fantastic. Of course, the downside is that we have to pay for it. One of the positives about being in a suburban area is that we don't have a huge hipster set where I live. It's primarily families with kids, so we have nice, quiet neighborhoods that are pleasant to inhabit. I can't imagine living anywhere else, although we're inclined to retire somewhere cheaper (perhaps abroad).

    Peace,

    Big Stacks from Kakalak

  • Duderonomy said:

    My hood is good. Just moved across town, now beside the Raval (middle-eastern ghetto, great food) and Poble Sec (up-and-coming hipster area). Cost of living is cheaper in Barcelona than in England, and the weather, food, surroundings, women, football, beach, price of booze, and public transport are all brilliant.

    How is the economy there? Isn't Spain overall still lagging post recession? Do you work locally?

  • The supercomputer gave my section of Indianapolis a 74.
    My hood is cool. We get all the extremes of the seasons. Housing is affordable.
    Abandon the beach,your metropolis and your ambitions to come get fat in the midwest.
    You want to move to a city nicknamed naptown. We do take some great naps here.




  • My area is pretty OK:


  • DB_CooperDB_Cooper Manhatin' 7,823 Posts
    My hood got a 78, with my work neighborhood clocking in at an 85. Apparently, Murray Hill around the Park Avenue/Madison Avenue area is very livable if you have infinity dollars. Lots of local amenities, apparently.

  • yuichiyuichi Urban sprawl 11,331 Posts
    area is very livable if you have infinity dollars

    These areas tend to have the most self-absorbed, entitled, and uptight folks...

  • ReynaldoReynaldo 6,054 Posts
    Sunnyvale gets an 86 for live-ability. Every unused space is being developed at a rapid pace. Old concrete office parks are being torn down, ground up and recycled into new ones right on the spot. Apple and Google are assimilating empty office buildings like the Borg. There are office buildings being built on top of artificial landfill hills. Everyone that can afford a Tesla has one or is on a waiting list to get one.

  • LaserWolfLaserWolf Portland Oregon 11,517 Posts
    You have a Tesla?

  • Ugh. This thread makes me sad.

    I like Toronto a lot. But I will probably never own property here. Which is pretty depressing I guess.

    When we were in Montreal to see Day spin, I distinctly remember talking with Vintage's better half about her love of Montreal and trying to convince him to move there. Winters were a topic of concern I believe.

    I just want to move to a big hippie commune out in the country with all my best friends. As long as we can commute into a major urban area within an hour or two. I never thought I'd be a hippie.

  • parallaxparallax no-style-having mf'er 1,266 Posts
    BeatChemist said:


    I just want to move to a big hippie commune out in the country with all my best friends. As long as we can commute into a major urban area within an hour or two. I never thought I'd be a hippie.

    So, like, Ajax then? ;)


  • parallax said:
    BeatChemist said:


    I just want to move to a big hippie commune out in the country with all my best friends. As long as we can commute into a major urban area within an hour or two. I never thought I'd be a hippie.

    So, like, Ajax then? ;)


    Exactly.

  • dollar_bindollar_bin I heartily endorse this product and/or event 2,326 Posts
    Reynaldo said:
    Sunnyvale gets an 86 for live-ability. Every unused space is being developed at a rapid pace. Old concrete office parks are being torn down, ground up and recycled into new ones right on the spot. Apple and Google are assimilating empty office buildings like the Borg. There are office buildings being built on top of artificial landfill hills. Everyone that can afford a Tesla has one or is on a waiting list to get one.

    Sunnyvale? I thought you lived out in the sticks Please tell me you're rockin' an Eichler.

    Welcome to Silicon Valley, home of the toxic waste dump. We lived in an apartment building for six months before I googled the abandoned warehouse behind the complex and discovered it was a Superfund Cleanup site. Sure wish they had told us that before we planted and ate tomatoes in our little garden.


  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,787 Posts
    Grafwritah said:
    Duderonomy said:

    My hood is good. Just moved across town, now beside the Raval (middle-eastern ghetto, great food) and Poble Sec (up-and-coming hipster area). Cost of living is cheaper in Barcelona than in England, and the weather, food, surroundings, women, football, beach, price of booze, and public transport are all brilliant.

    How is the economy there? Isn't Spain overall still lagging post recession? Do you work locally?

    The Spanish economy isn't great but Barcelona is the most prosperous part of the country, helped by a massive tourism industry. As an English teacher I find work reasonably easy to come by as most Spaniards/Catalans see English as an essential professional skill and the younger generation are increasingly expected to have an English qualification (Cambridge Entrance Exam or equivalent) as well as a degree.
    I mainly teach Doctors & nurses as English is the international language of medicine.
    I often feel guilty that my native language has granted me a career with opportunities all over the world... this feels un-earned, but there you go.
    As English is currently the world's lingua franca (HAHAHAAHAA, take that Frenchies ;-P), outside of the professional sector people working in bars, cafes, restaurants etc also need some English, although their lower pay bracket makes it [em]raerer[/em] for this group to attend classes in institutions - they are more likely to look for cheaper one-to-one lessons, paid in cash.
    Which reminds me, a friend of mine who has been here for 9+ years thinks that although Spain's economy is officially very shaky, he's certain that there must be a massive *black* economy (under-the-counter, un-taxed) in effect, and my own observations bear this out to some extent; many smaller businesses will not run cash payments through the till and give a receipt unless you ask for one, and my friend earns an untaxed, cash-in-hand living wage and is surely not the only one to do so - there are many Americans teaching English (pffffttttt!) in Barcelona, and as 99% of them will not have a work permit, they must be working illegally too.

  • bassiebassie 11,710 Posts
    BeatChemist said:
    Ugh. This thread makes me sad.

    I like Toronto a lot. But I will probably never own property here. Which is pretty depressing I guess.

    When we were in Montreal to see Day spin, I distinctly remember talking with Vintage's better half about her love of Montreal and trying to convince him to move there. Winters were a topic of concern I believe.

    Maybe the winter in people's souls.

    http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/bystanders-ignored-man-dying-on-metro-platform?google_editors_picks=true

    Buying in Toronto is possible if you are willing to look outside of the downtown area. The city has a lot to offer beyond the core.

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 3,103 Posts
    I'm in Toronto... walking distance from Little India, the beach, and lots of public transit, so I'm straight, thanks.

    On the other hand, we endure cold, cold winters in the region, which is totally uncivilized and makes all hoods here unlivable on some level.




  • FrankFrank 2,370 Posts
    we're in the mountains above San Jose, Costa Rica, I'd say it's pretty live-able:


    and the view ain't half bad:



  • Frank said:
    we're in the mountains above San Jose, Costa Rica, I'd say it's pretty live-able:


    and the view ain't half bad:



    I'm always curious when people land in different places. Aren't you from Germany? What took you to Costa Rica? What do you do there?

  • The Spanish economy isn't great but Barcelona is the most prosperous part of the country, helped by a massive tourism industry. As an English teacher I find work reasonably easy to come by as most Spaniards/Catalans see English as an essential professional skill and the younger generation are increasingly expected to have an English qualification (Cambridge Entrance Exam or equivalent) as well as a degree.
    I mainly teach Doctors & nurses as English is the international language of medicine.
    I often feel guilty that my native language has granted me a career with opportunities all over the world... this feels un-earned, but there you go.
    As English is currently the world's lingua franca (HAHAHAAHAA, take that Frenchies ;-P), outside of the professional sector people working in bars, cafes, restaurants etc also need some English, although their lower pay bracket makes it [em]raerer[/em] for this group to attend classes in institutions - they are more likely to look for cheaper one-to-one lessons, paid in cash.
    Which reminds me, a friend of mine who has been here for 9+ years thinks that although Spain's economy is officially very shaky, he's certain that there must be a massive *black* economy (under-the-counter, un-taxed) in effect, and my own observations bear this out to some extent; many smaller businesses will not run cash payments through the till and give a receipt unless you ask for one, and my friend earns an untaxed, cash-in-hand living wage and is surely not the only one to do so - there are many Americans teaching English (pffffttttt!) in Barcelona, and as 99% of them will not have a work permit, they must be working illegally too.

    That's interesting. Isn't Barcelona somewhat expensive compared to the rest of the country as well? It seems weird to be able to just show up and start working and make a living wage in cash, and all for doing nothing more than speaking English.
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