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  • BaptBapt 2,503 Posts
    even though things have changed, you just never give up on it... you recognize that all things have to change and if you love something, you let it do what it do...

    TRUER WORDS HAVE NEVER BEEN SPOKEN, MY BRUTHA




  • BaptBapt 2,503 Posts





  • ill .... reminds me of when we did the same to our shelltops back in the day .... phil, i know you must have a few painter's caps layin' around .. lol


    Did you say painters caps?



    Really didn't want to post this one because it's blurry and I'm looking crazy wack with the beat street tee and urrthing... but yeah, I used to try to pull those painters caps down over my 'fro BITD. Hip Hop high fashion in '84, homeboy.
    lmao .. no doubt yo. 82-84 was the shit. patent leather adidas, name belts, leather bombers and painters caps .. oh, and don't forget ya cazals ..

  • Phill_MostPhill_Most 4,594 Posts



    That is FRESH, bapt! What Photoshop techniques do you use to do something like that?

  • BrianBrian 7,618 Posts
    this shit is awesome

  • DocMcCoyDocMcCoy "Go and laugh in your own country!" 5,920 Posts
    This picture is


    That one's my favourite as well.

    Serious question, Phill - have you ever thought of writing a book, like a personal, untold history of hip-hop? I suppose, in a sense, that's what you used to do with the Rap Sheet columns to some degree, but you could definitely document it from a different angle; a lot of different angles, in fact. Books about music often tend to deal with performers, or the history of certain styles of music or whatever, but there seems to be very little that's written from the perspective of the fan, how they related to the music, and how it related to them. Plus, you've participated at a bunch of different levels - fan, emcee, record dealer, writer, internet legend - and you've seen first hand the way in which hip-hop's grown and changed from its very earliest days right up to the present. You've got strong, informed opinions, and you can write. When people write about the history of hip-hop, they're usually talking to the people who were involved. Why not someone talking as one of the people who were involved?

    Two of my favourite books about hip-hop are Bobbito's "Where D'You Get Those?" and Martha Cooper & Henry Chalfant's "Subway Art". The reason I like them was because they were the first examples of anyone seriously trying to document those particular aspects (certainly in Bobbito's case), even though there's almost twenty years between them. Graf books are everywhere now, but "Subway Art" blew my mind when it came out - those insane six-page, fold-out, full car shots were unlike anything I'd ever seen. I can't believe I had a first edition of that shit and lost it! Bobbito's book was great too, but for a somewhat different reason. He took one small aspect of hip-hop culture/lifestyle/whatever you want to call it, and spun it out into how that aspect related to time, place, what was happening in the music (and basketball, obviously), and the whole thing carried so much more weight because you knew he was there, as were all the people he spoke to, and all that shit was an important part of their lives. I think that if you were to take a similar, broader approach, writing about the things you were involved in, your perspective on them, and how it shaped your world, it would make a great book. I know I'd want to read it, because shit like that fascinates me - the stories you never normally hear. And if I worked for a publishing house, I'd be PM'ing you right now. All that said, I'm sure you've got a bunch of things going on in your life that would be a far better use of your time, but it's gotta be something worth thinking about when the kids are a little older, surely?

  • Phill_MostPhill_Most 4,594 Posts

    Serious question, Phill - have you ever thought of writing a book, like a personal, untold history of hip-hop? I suppose, in a sense, that's what you used to do with the Rap Sheet columns to some degree, but you could definitely document it from a different angle; a lot of different angles, in fact. Books about music often tend to deal with performers, or the history of certain styles of music or whatever, but there seems to be very little that's written from the perspective of the fan, how they related to the music, and how it related to them. Plus, you've participated at a bunch of different levels - fan, emcee, record dealer, writer, internet legend - and you've seen first hand the way in which hip-hop's grown and changed from its very earliest days right up to the present. You've got strong, informed opinions, and you can write. When people write about the history of hip-hop, they're usually talking to the people who were involved. Why not someone talking as one of the people who were involved?

    Two of my favourite books about hip-hop are Bobbito's "Where D'You Get Those?" and Martha Cooper & Henry Chalfant's "Subway Art". The reason I like them was because they were the first examples of anyone seriously trying to document those particular aspects (certainly in Bobbito's case), even though there's almost twenty years between them. Graf books are everywhere now, but "Subway Art" blew my mind when it came out - those insane six-page, fold-out, full car shots were unlike anything I'd ever seen. I can't believe I had a first edition of that shit and lost it! Bobbito's book was great too, but for a somewhat different reason. He took one small aspect of hip-hop culture/lifestyle/whatever you want to call it, and spun it out into how that aspect related to time, place, what was happening in the music (and basketball, obviously), and the whole thing carried so much more weight because you knew he was there, as were all the people he spoke to, and all that shit was an important part of their lives. I think that if you were to take a similar, broader approach, writing about the things you were involved in, your perspective on them, and how it shaped your world, it would make a great book. I know I'd want to read it, because shit like that fascinates me - the stories you never normally hear. And if I worked for a publishing house, I'd be PM'ing you right now. All that said, I'm sure you've got a bunch of things going on in your life that would be a far better use of your time, but it's gotta be something worth thinking about when the kids are a little older, surely?

    I actually thought about doing something like that someday, but I think a publisher would probably be more interested in the memoirs of somebody like a KRS One or one of the Beastie Boys or even somebody like a Dante Ross more than they'd want to publish a book by Soulman. More than likely they wouldn't see it as something that's marketable enough. Who knows... I think I could do a pretty damn interesting book, though! Title suggestions, anyone?

    "Everything You Wanted To Know About That Real Sh*t But Were Afraid To Ask"?
    "I Am Curious (That Real Sh*t)"?
    "101 Things To Do Until That Real Sh*t Comes Back Into Style"?


    Co-sign on that "Subway Art" book, too... that one, and the "Hip Hop" book as well, were a real big deal to me back in 1984. A BIG deal. Kinda legitimized all this stuff that we were into that had been basically a big secret or just totally insignificant to the world at large. Nowadays hip hop is everywhere, but to see books that dealt with it in depth at that time was kinda mind blowing.

  • PEKPEK 735 Posts
    Title suggestions, anyone?
    'THE. Real. Sh*t.'

  • BaptBapt 2,503 Posts
    Aahh!!

    Techniques...Humm...?
    All the techniques, dunno.

    Glad you like it.

  • Phill_MostPhill_Most 4,594 Posts
    Aahh!!

    Techniques...Humm...?
    All the techniques, dunno.

    Glad you like it.

    Okay, let me try again...

    What did you use to do this art? Photoshop?

    How did you do this???



    Hope you understand the question, my french friend. Merci.

  • "Everything You Wanted To Know About That Real Sh*t But Were Afraid To Ask"?
    "I Am Curious (That Real Sh*t)"?
    "101 Things To Do Until That Real Sh*t Comes Back Into Style"?

    One of these titles (save the other two for chapter titles) plus the first two or three chapters + good intro from some dude = book sale = rad book. Go for it...



  • these pictures are great


    LOL @ your avatar. Nice!

    Phil, feelin your remixes man.
    Peace.

    http://worldofbeatsv2.blogspot.com/

    Bapt

    you laughing @ jp belmondo??! what? that man was the illest in Breathless(which in and of itself was an amazing movie!)

  • BaptBapt 2,503 Posts
    You laughing @ jp belmondo??! what? that man was the illest in Breathless(which in and of itself was an amazing movie!)

    Yo! Slow down.
    Take a breath, man.
    Wow! Cool.

    * I will have to make a new "peace" graemlin *
    * Maybe with the face of John Lennon *


  • BaptBapt 2,503 Posts

    Aahh!! Techniques...Humm...?
    All the techniques, dunno.
    Glad you like it.

    Okay, let me try again...
    What did you use to do this art? Photoshop?
    How did you do this???


    Yo! Phill, I hear you, man.
    yeah! I used Photoshop.
    I thought you asked me about which "Photoshops techniques" I used.
    Anyway, I didn't create a thing, you did.

    Y'a pas d'quoi (=your welcome)

    Bapt

    PS/ I studied ART for a while, during 5/6 years.

  • Phill_MostPhill_Most 4,594 Posts

    Aahh!! Techniques...Humm...?
    All the techniques, dunno.
    Glad you like it.

    Okay, let me try again...
    What did you use to do this art? Photoshop?
    How did you do this???


    Yo! Phill, I hear you, man.
    yeah! I used Photoshop.
    I thought you asked me about which "Photoshops techniques" I used.
    Anyway, I didn't create a thing, you did.

    Yes... I want to know HOW DID YOU DO THIS IN PHOTOSHOP. What filters did you use, what plug-ins did you use, did you just draw over the photo of the cassette by hand.... how did you do it. I mess with Photoshop a little myself (although I'm using an old version and am not trained in it by any means). I just liked the way it looked and was curious how you did it, hommie. Can you tell me step by step, plaese? Just pm me the info if you would be so kind, my man. Thanks.

  • BaptBapt 2,503 Posts

    * STUFF *

    Phill, PM comin...

  • BamboucheBambouche 1,484 Posts

    Before we say adios to 1984, I gotta give a shout to my man MC Dazz from Do Or Die Bedstuy, Brooklyn NY. Together we were the Sureshot 2 MCs, and for a short time in 1984 we ripped parties along with DJ Master Rob and DJ Jazzy Jay-Rock (aka Jollirock). Not long after this pic was taken, we lost touch with Dazz... heard he'd gone back to Brooklyn but never really knew the deal. Found out later he got knocked on some serious charges and has been incarcerated ever since, almost 20 years now. We still don't know what he could've done to get such serious time- he was a street kid, but we never knew him to be into anything that would get him a severe sentence like that. Anyway, I thought I'd post audio of the only tape I still have of MC Dazz, a practice tape we did in my crib in 1984. I think this is also the earliest tape I have of me rhyming... I had just started rapping in front of people.
    Sureshot 2 MCs- MC Dazz, Phantastic Philly Phill MC & DJ Master Rob


    Damn! I leave town for a week and Phill goes off. Can someone post the "Sureshot 2 MCs- MC Dazz, Phantastic Philly Phill MC & DJ Master Rob" mp3 again (with Phill's permission)? Link is dead and I need that for the collection!


    Thanks for taking the time to make this post Phill, I truly enjoy reading your stories.

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