Things You Could Live Without Ever Hearing Again

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  • waxjunkywaxjunky 1,850 Posts
    sakedelic said:
    Down By The River.



    Meters version?

  • Mac Miller's voice.

  • DanteDante 371 Posts
    Radiohead
    The Stones
    The entire prog rock generation
    Country
    90% of the early noughties 'indie rock' generation.
    Dub

  • Options
    Frank Zappa singing about yellow snow and Sheikh Yerbouti.

  • Options
    Oops, double.

  • luckluck 4,077 Posts
    Dante said:
    Radiohead
    The Stones
    The entire prog rock generation
    Country
    90% of the early noughties 'indie rock' generation.
    Dub

    Comedy.

  • pickwick33pickwick33 8,946 Posts
    Congas and bongos as a replacement for drums. Just sounds weak. I think of hacky-sacking hippies in a state park when I hear percussion used that way.

    Those things are fine for coloration, but I don't want to hear them carrying the rhythm.

    I can't think of any examples offhand, but I do remember watching a documentary years ago about the producer Daniel Lanois, and it seemed like his records all had that sound. I only saw this doc once a long time ago, so if I'm wrong, blame it on hazy memory.

    The only other instance I can think of is Wilbert Harrison's "Pretty Little Women," an sixties-era R&B record. Unfortunately it's on the obscure side and isn't on Youtube. But it's got this driving twangy-guitar rhythm that needs drums like a dead man needs a coffin. The conga drum they wound up using is a poor, poor replacement.

  • luckluck 4,077 Posts
    NomoreGarciaparra said:
    "Amazing Grace"

    ^ Has not heard The Soul Stirrers' version ca. 1963

  • Options
    luck said:
    NomoreGarciaparra said:
    "Amazing Grace"

    ^ Has not heard The Soul Stirrers' version ca. 1963

    Heard it. It's a great version. But my general aversion to the tune and its origin stands.

  • jammyjammy remixing bongo rock... 813 Posts
    93 til infinity
    the next episode
    simon says
    full clip
    hiphop (dead prez)

  • BeatnicholasBeatnicholas 1,005 Posts
    dido. that woman is the only singer who can make me violent. that little girl voice, like shes trying to sing Tom's Diner by Suzanne Vega but shes on horse tranquilizers... god.

  • JimsterJimster Cruffiton.etsy.com 6,889 Posts
    Drum solos (any)
    The kick drum micced across everything at a gig
    Dance musicways with no chords or basslines
    "We are experiencing an unusually high number of calls and your call has been placed in queue..."
    "No, we can't sell you the part, you have to buy a whole new one."
    The Cranberries
    The theme from "Friends"
    Shoplifter grimecore
    Flying Lotus
    Henrik Schwarz
    That retro 60's Amy Winehouse treatment that was being foisted upon us
    That retro 80's boogie sound that is being foisted upon us
    Anything big in Ibiza

  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,784 Posts
    Radiohead
    The Stones
    The entire prog rock generation
    [strike]Country[/strike]
    [strike]90% of the early noughties 'indie rock' generation.[/strike]
    Dub

    Comedy.

  • sakedelicsakedelic 247 Posts
    (oops, double post)

  • sakedelicsakedelic 247 Posts
    sakedelic said:
    Frank Zappa singing.

    And
    waxjunky said:
    sakedelic said:
    Down By The River.



    Meters version?
    "This video contains content from WMG, who has blocked it on copyright grounds."

    Guess I can live without hearing that too (but I might have heard it at some point, I can't recall), though I was willing to give The Meters a shot at it.

  • JimsterJimster Cruffiton.etsy.com 6,889 Posts
    Radiohead
    The Stones
    The entire prog rock generation
    [strike]Country[/strike]
    [strike]90% of the early noughties 'indie rock' generation.[/strike]
    Dub

    Comedy.

    Srs doe, I do not need any Radiohead in my life. Pallid musics dat.

  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,784 Posts
    [strike]Radiohead[/strike]
    The Stones
    The entire prog rock generation
    [strike]Country[/strike]
    [strike]90% of the early noughties 'indie rock' generation.[/strike]
    Dub

    Comedy.


    OK. No Radiohead ever again, and I wouldn't be distraught, but I do like some of their stuff.



    All prog-rock?
    No Dub?


    Maybe not crazy talk, but life would be a little poorer to write-off such a large amount of music like that.

  • UB40
    Lady Gaga
    American Pie
    Kid Rock
    Gilbert Gottfried
    Geordie Commentator on Gol TV
    Alan Smith
    Faustao

  • DanteDante 371 Posts
    [strike]Radiohead[/strike]
    The Stones
    The entire prog rock generation
    [strike]Country[/strike]
    [strike]90% of the early noughties 'indie rock' generation.[/strike]
    Dub

    Comedy.


    OK. No Radiohead ever again, and I wouldn't be distraught, but I do like some of their stuff.



    All prog-rock?
    No Dub?


    Maybe not crazy talk, but life would be a little poorer to write-off such a large amount of music like that.

    The title of the thread is 'Things You Could Live Without Ever Listening To Again' not 'Things you've always hated or have never listened to'.
    I like The Stones, some dub and can listen to some prog stuff (not to many). In my early teens I was heavy into indie rock. All I'm saying is that era for me has gone and I have enough music to discover, so never hearing that stuff again wouldn't worry me too much.

  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,784 Posts
    Agreed, understood - no beef, I'm savng that for the 5 yr olds.

  • pickwick33pickwick33 8,946 Posts
    All prog-rock?
    No Dub?


    Maybe not crazy talk, but life would be a little poorer to write-off such a large amount of music like that.


    Life is also too short to invest time and $$$ into something that isn't your thing.

    I know there's a line between "not good" and "not my bag," but it gets blurry sometimes (especially if you have to hear it against your will). If you don't like it, you don't like it and that's just the way the shit goes.

  • HorseleechHorseleech 3,830 Posts
    pickwick33 said:
    Pamplemousse (the hipster duo who do indie-rock versions of contemporary soul hits; the songs they're covering probably aren't shit anyway, but the female half's emotionless voice gets to me...and not in a good way)

    Cosine.

    +

    Velcro
    Seinfeld Bass

  • Duderonomy said:
    no beef, I'm savng that for the 5 yr olds.

    :pasue: :oh_my:

  • GrandfatherGrandfather 2,303 Posts
    Ironic Hipster-ish cover songs on youtube by cute chicks genre
    Douchebag House/Electro/Dance music, i.e. LMFAO
    Lil Wayne singing/guitar
    Electro House remixes of every popular song

  • Mr_Lee_PHDMr_Lee_PHD 2,042 Posts
    Those vocal acrobatic Christina Aguilera type singers that have to cram as many notes into every sustained vocal as possible.

    AaaAAAAaaEEEeeeIIiiiOOooOOooouuuUuUUuUuUuuUuuAaAAAaaAAAaaAA...

    :ehhx2:

  • vintageinfantsvintageinfants 4,537 Posts
    Mr_Lee_PHD said:
    Those vocal acrobatic Christina Aguilera type singers that have to cram as many notes into every sustained vocal as possible.

    AaaAAAAaaEEEeeeIIiiiOOooOOooouuuUuUUuUuUuuUuuAaAAAaaAAAaaAA...

    :ehhx2:

    i remember a video where she sang etta james' "at last"............ for 6 minutes.

    it's not ad-libbing when it increases the song length be 200%

  • eliseelise 3,252 Posts
    Mr_Lee_PHD said:
    Those vocal acrobatic Christina Aguilera type singers that have to cram as many notes into every sustained vocal as possible.

    AaaAAAAaaEEEeeeIIiiiOOooOOooouuuUuUUuUuUuuUuuAaAAAaaAAAaaAA...

    :ehhx2:

    Whenever someone sings like that on the television, my grandmother says, "Find the damned note already!".

  • sakedelicsakedelic 247 Posts
    Mr_Lee_PHD said:
    Those vocal acrobatic Christina Aguilera type singers that have to cram as many notes into every sustained vocal as possible.

    AaaAAAAaaEEEeeeIIiiiOOooOOooouuuUuUUuUuUuuUuuAaAAAaaAAAaaAA...

    :ehhx2:

    It's called 'melisma'. Aretha Franklin is most commonly credited with bringing melisma to popular music from gospel and its abuse has def. become a plague of epic proportions in the past 20 years.

  • HorseleechHorseleech 3,830 Posts
    sakedelic said:
    Mr_Lee_PHD said:
    Those vocal acrobatic Christina Aguilera type singers that have to cram as many notes into every sustained vocal as possible.

    AaaAAAAaaEEEeeeIIiiiOOooOOooouuuUuUUuUuUuuUuuAaAAAaaAAAaaAA...

    :ehhx2:

    It's called 'melisma'. Aretha Franklin is credited for bringing melisma to popular music from gospel and its abuse has def. become a plague of epic proportions in the past 20 years.

    Horseleech crackpot term for this = Hypermelismatic

  • fishmongerfunkfishmongerfunk 4,154 Posts
    Mr_Lee_PHD said:
    Those vocal acrobatic Christina Aguilera type singers that have to cram as many notes into every sustained vocal as possible.

    AaaAAAAaaEEEeeeIIiiiOOooOOooouuuUuUUuUuUuuUuuAaAAAaaAAAaaAA...:ehhx2:

    Christina Aguilera and the Hideous Cult of Oversouling

    To me, the horrific part of Christina Aguilera's rendition of the National Anthem -- and "rendition" is an apt term for it, because she kidnapped the song and shipped it out to be tortured -- was not her mangling of the words, but her mangling of the tune itself: to paraphrase the great Chuck Berry, she "lost the beauty (such as it is) of the melody until it sounds just like a (godawful) symphony."

    This is the same grotesque style -- 17 different notes for every vocal syllable -- that has so dominated the pop and R&B charts for years. Mariah Carey and Whitney Houston are relatively minor offenders, but singers like Aguilera -- who admittedly possesses a great instrument -- just don't seem to know when to stop, turning each song into an Olympic sport as they drain it of its implicit soul, as if running through the entire scale on every single word was somehow a token of sincerity.

    It's called melisma -- the bending of syllables for bluesy or soulful effect -- and what's creepy about the way it's used now is that it perverts America's true genius for song, as evinced by its creators in the world of gospel and R&B, like Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin.

    You will hear more of this tonsil-twisting insincerity -- to your eternal sorrow -- if you watch any episode of American Idol.

    The great Jerry Wexler -- who produced both Ray and Aretha -- coined a great term for it: "oversouling." He described it as "the gratuitous and confected melisma" that hollows out a song and drains it of meaning. Wexler, who knew more about soul than any producer before or since, said:

    "Time and again I have found that flagrantly artificial attempts at melisma are either a substitute for real fire and passion or a cover-up for not knowing the melody... Please, learn the song first, and then sing it from the heart."

    And Christina, he wasn't referring to the words.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-eskow/christina-aguilera-and-th_b_819979.html
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