is FISH good?

youngEINSTEINyoungEINSTEIN 2,443 Posts
edited June 2005 in Off Topic (NRR)
i personally dont like fish and alot of people think i'm weird for this. i'd like to know some of you all's opinions on fish. peace, stein. . .
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  • johmbolayajohmbolaya 4,472 Posts
    i personally dont like fish and alot of people think i weird for this. i'd like to know some of you all's opinions on fish. peace, stein. . .

    The food?
    The card game?
    The ex-drummer from Fishbone?
    The guy from Marillion?
    Phish?

  • mylatencymylatency 10,475 Posts
    you need to take an omega 3 supplement then

    vital ish for the body

  • nrichnrich 932 Posts
    Is this going to turn into one of those favorite Popeye's side orders threads?

  • PEKPEK 735 Posts
    you need to take an omega 3 supplement then

    vital ish for the body



    Found in (beneficial) fat-laden fish such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, etc. Better if you eat wild versus farm raised... If you examine the longevity of people from fish eating countries (such as Japan historically and especially Okinawa), a lot of these people lived longer, healthier lives (Okinawa is famous for boasting the highest population density of people over the age of 100) - I suspect that if you examined Hawai'i pre/post-Spam, you'd see wildly varying mortality (and chronic illness/morbidity) rates...



    No land meat eater here... And no heavy sleep syndromes post-meals any longer either...

  • Hotsauce84Hotsauce84 8,451 Posts
    I bet Archaic opens this thinking it's about Ngafsh.















































    You did, didn't you, Archaic?

  • youngEINSTEINyoungEINSTEIN 2,443 Posts
    i'm talkin' about the FOOD johmbo. thanks for the omega 3 tip mylatency. i'm already in my 30's. is it too late? peace, stein. . .

  • johmbolayajohmbolaya 4,472 Posts
    I suspect that if you examined Hawai'i pre/post-Spam, you'd see wildly varying mortality (and chronic illness/morbidity) rates...



    Yep. My grandfather was someone who had fish as a major part of his diet, along with poi. Fish and poi, that was the breakfast, lunch, and dinner for champions for years. He did eat other foods too, but when I was a kid he used to walk and run for a few miles, and come back home. Didn't smoke, didn't drink. Strong, sturdy man for years. He eventually suffered a stroke, and his health was neglected by those around him, and had he been monitored better, he may be around today.



    However, one gets a taste of a good cheeseburger and it's all over. So it's not just Spam, but I do know for a fact that the methods of storing and preserving foods before and during World War II has never left the Hawaiian dinner table. It's a struggle that I go through every day, trust me. I don't want to be this way anymore.





    I am in my 30's. I'm not deep into the science and mechanisms of the body, but as I get older, I feel everything even more. If anything, pushing yourself will add some days or years to your life. I go back and forth between doing very well with diet and food control, and others where I'm not. There are many reports out there which talk about the health benefits of fish, whether eaten or in pill form. If good cuts of fish aren't widely available, get it in pill form.

  • Big_ChanBig_Chan 5,088 Posts
    i personally dont like fish and alot of people think i'm weird for this. i'd like to know some of you all's opinions on fish. peace, stein. . .

    Damn Stein, HELL YES fish is good. I just got in from a dope sushi spot and I've been eating sushi and sashimi all night! Also lots of good sake!

  • pickwick33pickwick33 8,946 Posts
    i personally dont like fish and alot of people think i weird for this. i'd like to know some of you all's opinions on fish. peace, stein. . .

    The food?
    The card game?
    The ex-drummer from Fishbone?
    The guy from Marillion?
    Phish?

    I was thinking of Abe Vigoda's character on BARNEY MILLER who got his own spinoff show (naturally called FISH).

  • twoplytwoply 2,903 Posts
    i personally dont like fish and alot of people think i'm weird for this. i'd like to know some of you all's opinions on fish. peace, stein. . .

    Never liked it. Except salmon. I used to eat salmon occasionally. But for the most part, seafood always tasted... wait for it... fishy to me.


    On an unrelated note, there was a thread on another message board I go to that had a thread about turntablism (some dude asking who to check for) and your name came up. Are you actually a turnabalist, or was that person smoking crack?

  • soulrezsoulrez 565 Posts
    stein see you at rootdown dawg...

    peace

  • MangomanMangoman 549 Posts
    Maybe you can have someone over at the Meatshake make one up for you. But make sure they don't give you a turkeyshake by accident, shuz darn..... GO JOE TEX!

    I'm picky about fish, yellowtail is yummy griled fresh not over grilled.... But I usually go for the fish and chips my self! Had to much fish growing up. But I feel ripped off on how pricey fish is, that's why I go with a steak at a fancy resterant.... If I'm going out for fish I'll hit up a fish market or somthing where I know it's fresh....

  • DubiousDubious 1,865 Posts
    well im originally from nova scotia so sea food is in my genes big time.

    can't complain about anything that came out the ocean i love all seafood from octopus to cod to herring to sardines to squid to salmon etc etc

    when we were a kids we would collect periwinkles (the little snails that you find on rocks in lo tide) and take em home, boil em up and use little pins to pry them out.

    shucking oysters.. mmm nothing like a fresh oyster pulled right out of the atlantic.. down the hatch!

    on many a hot summer day my dad and me would finish up a days work on the old house, drive down to this parking lot, there was a dude who'd park there and sell huge fresh caught mackeral out of the back of his truck.. slap those on the BBQ and you are golden (my all time fave is mackeral, esp smoked)

    and personally i cannot live without sushi.. and i aint talkin california rolls...


  • Options
    Look at it this way, which meat do you want to eat; the one from a fat ass land animal that stands around all day and gets it's ass shot up with hormones, or the one that swims like a madman all day long. You get better energy from eating fish. I eat steak too, but fish is on the plate 3-4 times a week.

    And yeah man, cosign that Omega-3's are good substitute to get the benefits without eating the meat. Either that or Cod Liver Oil, though it might be the same thing packaged with a different name.


  • CosmoCosmo 9,764 Posts
    i'm talkin' about the FOOD johmbo. thanks for the omega 3 tip mylatency. i'm already in my 30's. is it too late? peace, stein. . .

    It is never too late.

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    ONe major fish concern is levels of Mercury.

  • GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts
    ONe major fish concern is levels of Mercury.

    You know, people concern themselves about the levels of mercury in water, fish, etc... yet I'm curious if anybody notices that most people have MERCURY filling in their teeth, and not in relatively minor amounts... It's the same mercury people, and you're sucking on it everyday.

  • GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts
    Look at it this way, which meat do you want to eat; the one from a fat ass land animal that stands around all day and gets it's ass shot up with hormones, or the one that swims like a madman all day long. You get better energy from eating fish. I eat steak too, but fish is on the plate 3-4 times a week.

    You know, I eat meat, and fish a little, but lately I've been thinking...

    wouldn't it be nasty if meat in packages at the grocery store was human? What if you saw a big jar full of HUMAN's FEET? or instead of chicken wings, HUMAN ARMS? Think about that for a minute: plastic wrapped ARMS in a little styrofoam tray.


    People play it off but it's the same thing.

  • PEKPEK 735 Posts

    You know, I eat meat, and fish a little, but lately I've been thinking...
    wouldn't it be nasty if meat in packages at the grocery store was human? What if you saw a big jar full of HUMAN's FEET? or instead of chicken wings, HUMAN ARMS? Think about that for a minute: plastic wrapped ARMS in a little styrofoam tray.
    People play it off but it's the same thing.

    This is similar to what persuaded me to alter my diet - sittin' in a Boston Market in Arlington, VA, and thinkin' of chewin' tendons, sinews, etc. while eatin'; it pretty much led to me swearing off land meat altogether... Which wasn't easy considerin' the allure of pulled pork sandwiches (which I devoured w/ regular consistency when livin' in the ATL)/etc., but feel better healthwise for it...

  • parenparen 537 Posts
    salmon, natto, rice = way of life.


  • djannadjanna 1,543 Posts
    whoa, this is so crazy!!!!!!!

    I've been a vegetarian for 16 years, but I've been having bad digestion problems for the last few years and I'm starting to get bad reactions to soy and dairy and I've been gaining weight despite a healthy diet and working out regularly. One of my doctors suggested I think about eating fish and maybe chicken.

    I stopped eating meat because I love the animals, but now my body is not loving me and I have to figure out what's best for me.

    So yesterday I had a salad with some salmon, it was so weird! But not totally bad and then last night I had Alaskan King Crab legs (like one) and a bit of Fish and Chips- it was all very surreal. So I might start eating fish, I'm at least going to try and see if it makes me feel better.


  • Options
    wouldn't it be nasty if meat in packages at the grocery store was human?

    I'm always down for a lapdance or two.



    What if you saw a big jar full of HUMAN's FEET? or instead of chicken wings, HUMAN ARMS?

    I'd buy it, take it home, open it, act suprised, call my lawyer and sue the everloving shit out of all involved.

  • ariel_calmerariel_calmer 3,762 Posts
    I thought soulstrutters didn't "eat the fish"???



    Fish and seafood is definitely the way to go. Just ate sushi last night and will probably fry some fish up tonight with greens & white rice. It's all about getting it fresh or flash frozen. Down here there's a fish called talapia which you can get fresh and is very good.



    Preparation is so very important, too. Poaching is a great way to get a good, rich flavor but low fat.



    Here's about how I do it up: Finely dice and fry in oil 2 cloves of garlic or about 1/2" of ginger. When it starts to brown, put about 1/4" deep of chicken or fish broth (japanese dashi works) in the bottom of the pan. When it starts to boil, turn down the heat to medium. If you want more flavor, try adding up to 1 TSP soy sauce or vinnegar, or cilantro, or a few drops chili sauce, or a pinch cumin, or lime juice, or almost anything you think will complement the taste of the fish. Then add the fish and cover. Thin whitefish will poach very quickly, say 3 minutes a side, while salmon will take longer for a thicker cut. Don't overcook it tho, especially salmon! Use the broth for putting on top of white rice.



    Catfish is ridiculously good with ginger and a little soy sauce. Cilantro + chili + lime is more of a thai flavor. If you want, you can poach with coconut milk and a red chili sauce for a taste similar to the thai salmon that's ubiquitous at thai lunch spots. You can also steam some veggies while you're doing the fish and do almost a whole meal in one saucepan.



    Cookstrut rocks....



    I often chill here: http://www.recipezaar.com/

  • ariel_calmerariel_calmer 3,762 Posts

    You know, I eat meat, and fish a little, but lately I've been thinking...
    wouldn't it be nasty if meat in packages at the grocery store was human? What if you saw a big jar full of HUMAN's FEET? or instead of chicken wings, HUMAN ARMS? Think about that for a minute: plastic wrapped ARMS in a little styrofoam tray.
    People play it off but it's the same thing.

    This is similar to what persuaded me to alter my diet - sittin' in a Boston Market in Arlington, VA, and thinkin' of chewin' tendons, sinews, etc. while eatin'; it pretty much led to me swearing off land meat altogether... Which wasn't easy considerin' the allure of pulled pork sandwiches (which I devoured w/ regular consistency when livin' in the ATL)/etc., but feel better healthwise for it...

    Eating animal flesh is pretty grotesque and unnecessary. That said, I can't stay away from the occaisional pork burritto or backyard burger blackened chicken sandwich. It's just in my blood.

    I firmly believe that what's more important than one person going 100% vegan or vegitarian is a wide reduction of meat consumption. Too many americans treat meat like it's necessary in every meal.

  • ariel_calmerariel_calmer 3,762 Posts
    Oh and douds I will post my bangin fish chowder recipe if anybody wants!

  • ariel_calmerariel_calmer 3,762 Posts
    ONe major fish concern is levels of Mercury.

    Farmed fish, my friend!

  • The_NonThe_Non 5,688 Posts
    According to the Union of Concerned Scientists (www.ucsusa.org), over 68% of all seafood consumed in the United States is imported, and most of it is industrially produced. Many of these commodities are farm-raised and often involve little oversight regarding antibiotic drug use. While the U.S. government has standards that should ban imports with high levels of antibiotics in seafood, there is essentially no enforcement. Farmed salmon have more antibiotics administered by weight than any other form of livestock. Farmed salmon have significantly higher levels of PCBs, dioxin, and other cancer causing agents over wild salmon.[/b]

    Nobody's safe, fish is bad news food. While healthy for people in an ideal environment, our current oceanic environment is being raped by new technologies used by fisheries throughout the world, making the ocean ecosystem (and by association the biosphere known as "Earth") at grave risk.


    From National Geographic, Bijal P. Trivedi
    National Geographic Today

    February 25, 2002

    The researchers found that quantity of fish hauled from the North Atlantic has doubled since the 1950s and increased eight-fold from levels harvested at the turn of the last century.

    The result has been the collapse of fisheries in the North Atlantic and around the world???fish stocks in the Northern Atlantic are only one third of what they were in 1950 and one sixth what they were in 1900.

    And this decline is accelerating, said Daniel Pauly, who led the study.

    Fishes depleted one by one

    Once a particular fish stock is depleted the fishermen simply move onto another species. They gradually work their way down the food web, catching smaller and smaller fish. This changes the entire structure of the ecosystem. Creatures that were previously prey become the predators, and thrive.

    In the last decade there have been huge increases in the populations of non-fish, such as shrimp, scallops and crabs, because the fishermen have removed the large fish. These non-fish are at the bottom of the food web. Once they are gone there is almost nothing left, said Pauly.

    Because the ecosystem has been changed so dramatically a fishing moratorium is not sufficient to allow fish populations to recover.

    A study of more than 90 marine fish populations???including cod, tuna, haddock, herring, mackeral, etc???revealed that many species that suffered more than a decade of more than 60 percent declines did not rebound, even after 15 years, said Jeffrey Hutchings, of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

    There is a widespread misconception that fish are less prone to extinction, than birds or mammals for example, because they produce millions of eggs and thus low populations can quickly recover, said Hutchings. But this is not true. These fish stocks have been so depleted that there are few young. Fewer still escape predators and fishing nets and survive long enough to reach sexual maturity and reproduce, he added.

    Go light on the fish, k?
    Peace
    T.N.

  • PEKPEK 735 Posts
    Yo - that fish chowder recipe?



    As for cookin', highly recommend doin' it yourself (sushi included if you're able to source fresh, never frozen salmon and tuna [usually yellowfin given that bluefin tends to head straight to Nippon])... You're able to control/supervise salt content, oil, etc., thereby ensuring that the levels are to your satisfaction (and usually more reasonable than somethin' generically prepared @ a food establishment such as a restaurant)... Processed ain't necessarily good...

  • ariel_calmerariel_calmer 3,762 Posts
    According to the Union of Concerned Scientists (www.ucsusa.org), over 68% of all seafood consumed in the United States is imported, and most of it is industrially produced. Many of these commodities are farm-raised and often involve little oversight regarding antibiotic drug use. While the U.S. government has standards that should ban imports with high levels of antibiotics in seafood, there is essentially no enforcement. Farmed salmon have more antibiotics administered by weight than any other form of livestock. Farmed salmon have significantly higher levels of PCBs, dioxin, and other cancer causing agents over wild salmon.[/b]



    Nobody's safe, fish is bad news food. While healthy for people in an ideal environment, our current oceanic environment is being raped by new technologies used by fisheries throughout the world, making the ocean ecosystem (and by association the biosphere known as "Earth") at grave risk.




    I've heard the PCB & dioxins claims and don't believe they're cause for too much panic. For one, the PCB levels are exaggerated. They are by most accounts safe. If you look closely, they're not talking about parts-per-million, they're talking about parts-per-TRILLION! For another, the sample they took was extremely small (6 or 7 fish, I forget - a ridiculously small sampling). I took a look around. Successive studies have found elevated levels in US raised salmon but not as high as european raised salmon and not as high as the EWG study. Salmon are good subjects because they are natural carnivores, so they are fed a feed with some fish by products in it, which is the source of the high PCBs. Other fish aren't subject to the same problem. Despite flaws this study has been repeated in the echo chamber of online "news" as a voice of authority, to encourage panic and anti-consumer behavior. It's similar to the way these groups use data (or lack of data) on genetically modified food to incense people and cloud judgement.



    Which brings up another point. This study was initially made by EWG, a far-left group whose studies are flawed and have an interest in anti-progressive movements. A few years ago groups were claiming farm-raised fish had higher levels of bacteria, which proved not to be true. Or even don't want genetically engineered "yellow rice" to be farmed in Africa, even though it will save MILLIONS from going blind from malnutrition and dying of hunger. I place Greenpeace in this category and won't donate anything to them. They believe almost anything that caters to their agendas..... even pro-palestinian causes, if you want to take it there. Or take a look at other well-funded leftist groups like ANSWER. Q: which side of the tiananmen square massacre did ANSWER's founders take? A: CHINA's communist government, not the students. These are not the happyearthycrunchy organizations that they claim they are.



    Anyhow, check out the response to the salmon allegations on the page of Patrick Moore. (by the way, he's a co-founder of greenpeace who dropped out when he realized their agenda was non-progressive, uses bogus science, and isn't sincerely trying to fix the issues plaguing the world)

    http://www.greenspirit.com



    IMO Ideally farmed fish in general is a good thing. Wild salmon and fish in general are being overfished, I agree. For now I only eat salmon about once or twice a month. I hope that farm-raising will catch on once the feed issue is worked out, and people will make the right decision.



    From National Geographic, Bijal P. Trivedi

    National Geographic Today



    February 25, 2002



    The researchers found that quantity of fish hauled from the North Atlantic has doubled since the 1950s and increased eight-fold from levels harvested at the turn of the last century.



    The result has been the collapse of fisheries in the North Atlantic and around the world???fish stocks in the Northern Atlantic are only one third of what they were in 1950 and one sixth what they were in 1900.



    And this decline is accelerating, said Daniel Pauly, who led the study.



    Fishes depleted one by one



    Once a particular fish stock is depleted the fishermen simply move onto another species. They gradually work their way down the food web, catching smaller and smaller fish. This changes the entire structure of the ecosystem. Creatures that were previously prey become the predators, and thrive.



    In the last decade there have been huge increases in the populations of non-fish, such as shrimp, scallops and crabs, because the fishermen have removed the large fish. These non-fish are at the bottom of the food web. Once they are gone there is almost nothing left, said Pauly.



    Because the ecosystem has been changed so dramatically a fishing moratorium is not sufficient to allow fish populations to recover.



    A study of more than 90 marine fish populations???including cod, tuna, haddock, herring, mackeral, etc???revealed that many species that suffered more than a decade of more than 60 percent declines did not rebound, even after 15 years, said Jeffrey Hutchings, of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.



    There is a widespread misconception that fish are less prone to extinction, than birds or mammals for example, because they produce millions of eggs and thus low populations can quickly recover, said Hutchings. But this is not true. These fish stocks have been so depleted that there are few young. Fewer still escape predators and fishing nets and survive long enough to reach sexual maturity and reproduce, he added.




    Which is why I (ideally) advocate farm raised fish

  • ariel_calmerariel_calmer 3,762 Posts
    Chowder recipe! (stolen party from recipezaar) I modified this to be a little more like my mom's clam chowder recipe, but using fish. I don't go for the corn starch thickened chowder!

    http://www.recipezaar.com/31863

    Fish Chowder #31863

    6-8 slices bacon
    2 cups chopped onions
    6 ounces sliced fresh mushrooms
    4 cups chicken broth
    4 cups diced potatoes
    other veggies if ya want.... (celery, carrots, etc.)
    1/2 teaspoon tarragon
    1/2 teaspoon rosemary
    1/4 cup fresh chopped cilantro
    2 lbs fresh fish (any firm whitefish)
    1/2 lb cooked shrimp (optional)
    1 cup fresh corn
    1 cup light cream (or to taste)
    1 cup skim milk (or to taste)
    Tabasco sauce or hot sauce (optional)
    8-10 servings Change size or US/metric
    2 hours 1 hr prep

    In large stock pot or Dutch oven, fry 4 slices of bacon until almost crisp.
    Remove from pan, crush into small pieces, and put aside.
    In bacon drippings, saute onion and mushrooms until tender.
    Add chicken broth, potatoes, and spices, simmer for 20 minutes.
    Cut fish into 1" pieces and add to mixture.
    Add corn (cut off the cob) and shrimp or scallops if desired.
    Simmer for another 15 minutes.
    Season to taste with salt and pepper if desired.
    Stir in bacon, milk, and cream.
    Heat and serve.
    Top with a few shakes of hot sauce for a little spice.
    Serve with warm French or Cuban bread.
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