o-dub on coke rap

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  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    A STEADY DIET OF COKE

    LET STAY ON TOPIC PLEEZ.

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    preach on

  • HAZHAZ 3,373 Posts


    I don't think

    I agree, but If Archaic would have written that the crack rap fad started in 2002 there would be dudes lining up to clown on him & rip him a new one. People would be like, "I guess Harvey never saw New Jack City" or some shit. lol

  • GuzzoGuzzo 8,611 Posts


    I don't think

    I agree, but If Archaic would have written that the crack rap fad started in 2002 there would be dudes lining up to clown on him & rip him a new one. People would be like, "I guess Harvey never saw New Jack City" or some shit. lol

    I thnk its safe to say that Olivers opinion that Crack Rap really gained steam in 2002 is pretty much not agreed upon by the soul strut massive.

    has anyone else agreed with him on that yet?

  • deejdeej 5,125 Posts
    A STEADY DIET OF COKE

    LET STAY ON TOPIC PLEEZ.
    Seriously, even Jim Derogatis, the dude who Kelefa ripped in his 'Rockism' article and whose favorite rappers are like cherrywine and kanye and PM Dawn and who's railed against gangsta/drug/crack rap for YEARS sez that Clipse released one of the best records of the year.

  • haha it's true. The byline of this article should read:

    IN QUEST TO UNDERSTAND RAP TRENDS, WRITER DISCOVERS BLACK MARKET DRUG TRADE


  • mannybolonemannybolone 15,030 Posts
    Actually, writing the article for a Yay Area pub makes it even worse. There's an entire local lineage there that you didn't even bother to mention.

    So much for "not singling out" anyone.

    Your opinion on my failure to cultivate a locale is already well-noted.

    And jeez, I didn't even get credit for my mention of "White Gurl"?

    Just to restate: this wasn't a "history of crack rap" essay.

  • faux_rillzfaux_rillz 14,343 Posts
    Actually, writing the article for a Yay Area pub makes it even worse. There's an entire local lineage there that you didn't even bother to mention.

    So much for "not singling out" anyone.

    Did someone really say something about not singling anybody out?

    Such a remark would be completely contrary to the ethos of SpulStrut and might even merit BAN.

  • SwayzeSwayze 14,705 Posts
    Actually, writing the article for a Yay Area pub makes it even worse. There's an entire local lineage there that you didn't even bother to mention.

    So much for "not singling out" anyone.

    Your opinion on my failure to cultivate a locale is already well-noted.

    And jeez, I didn't even get credit for my mention of "White Gurl"?

    Just to restate: this wasn't a "history of crack rap" essay.


    Dude.... just give up. Seriously. Its not worth it.

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    Just to restate: this wasn't a "history of crack rap" essay.

    No doubt.

    "resurgence" is the question?

    Crunk Snap & Hyphy were lightning rod terms in the past Diet Coke Rap seems to be the new FAD(as you stated) that writers are attracted to.

    There has to be a dip/disappearence for a "resurgence".

  • mannybolonemannybolone 15,030 Posts
    Actually, writing the article for a Yay Area pub makes it even worse. There's an entire local lineage there that you didn't even bother to mention.

    So much for "not singling out" anyone.

    Your opinion on my failure to cultivate a locale is already well-noted.

    And jeez, I didn't even get credit for my mention of "White Gurl"?

    Just to restate: this wasn't a "history of crack rap" essay.


    Dude.... just give up. Seriously. Its not worth it.

    I'm not worried about convincing Archaic - I already know were RG is at as far as my work is concerned. But it concerns me that other people wading into this mess will think that I tried to write a history of crack rap piece when that is most certainly NOT what I do in said piece.

    I don't mind people debating the merits of my argument otherwise.

    All this personal shit is trash but I think everyone sees that for what it is.

  • ReynaldoReynaldo 6,054 Posts
    Just to restate: this wasn't a "history of crack rap" essay.

    No doubt.

    "resurgence" is the question?

    Crunk Snap & Hyphy were lightning rod terms in the past Diet Coke Rap seems to be the new FAD(as you stated) that writers are attracted to.

    There has to be a dip/disappearence for a "resurgence".
    "Surge" is the question.


  • SPlDEYSPlDEY Vegas 3,367 Posts
    Crack rap is the next Reality TV? Hm, not sure on that one. I am sure however that the general consensus of consumers opinions on Rap music is shifting. The consumer level of rap music has drastically changed. Game, and Jay-z's first week sales are a reflection. My younger cousin told me nobody buys CD's any more. He's done slanging burned cd's with the rest of his high school basketball team.

    Tower Records is in the process of shutting down. Right now, all Rap and hip hop cd's can be picked up for $1.50. The lowest price out of anything at the store, and really it just isn't selling. Just yesterday I copped a few hip hop cd's. Most of the real headz Hip-hop is gone. Any current chart Rappers are still there. There's a vast amount of this tattoed dude on the front cover No Limit graphically inspired Rap. To me, the fact that there is plenty of T.I., Jeezy, Clipse, and Game left on the shelf also proves something.

    Rap Trends are determined by the consumer, not by the artists. Gangsta and Crack rap are proven money making genres. Do I agree that coke inspired lyrics will garnish album sales? Nah. However, the formula of Popular producers + street heavy lyrics + Hype williams style video. Is still the most popular form of promotion for Album sales.

    My opinion is the same as what Haz said however changing one word:

    "Crack rap has been around since forever. If its popular today its cause the guys rapping about it are the most popular[/b] in the game at this moment."

    - spidey

  • noznoz 3,625 Posts
    Tower Records is in the process of shutting down. Right now, all Rap and hip hop cd's can be picked up for $1.50. The lowest price out of anything at the store, and really it just isn't selling. Just yesterday I copped a few hip hop cd's. Most of the real headz Hip-hop is gone. Any current chart Rappers are still there. There's a vast amount of this tattoed dude on the front cover No Limit graphically inspired Rap. To me, the fact that there is plenty of T.I., Jeezy, Clipse, and Game left on the shelf also proves something.

    Where exactly do you live?

  • SPlDEYSPlDEY Vegas 3,367 Posts
    I'm not worried about convincing Archaic - I already know were RG is at as far as my work is concerned. But it concerns me that other people wading into this mess will think that I tried to write a history of crack rap piece when that is most certainly NOT what I do in said piece.

    I don't mind people debating the merits of my argument otherwise.

    All this personal shit is trash but I think everyone sees that for what it is.

    O, I think you are more then qualified to have written on said topic. nuff said.

    - spidey

  • SPlDEYSPlDEY Vegas 3,367 Posts
    Where exactly do you live?

    Las Vegas.

    - spidey

  • faux_rillzfaux_rillz 14,343 Posts
    Tower Records is in the process of shutting down. Right now, all Rap and hip hop cd's can be picked up for $1.50. The lowest price out of anything at the store, and really it just isn't selling. Just yesterday I copped a few hip hop cd's. Most of the real headz Hip-hop is gone. Any current chart Rappers are still there. There's a vast amount of this tattoed dude on the front cover No Limit graphically inspired Rap. To me, the fact that there is plenty of T.I., Jeezy, Clipse, and Game left on the shelf also proves something.

    Where exactly do you live?

    Yeah, in NY it's nothing but white rappers and dudes that were signed to a major label a decade ago and then released half a dozen albums independently chronicling their ass-hurt over having been dropped.

  • mannybolonemannybolone 15,030 Posts
    Tower Records is in the process of shutting down. Right now, all Rap and hip hop cd's can be picked up for $1.50. The lowest price out of anything at the store, and really it just isn't selling. Just yesterday I copped a few hip hop cd's. Most of the real headz Hip-hop is gone. Any current chart Rappers are still there. There's a vast amount of this tattoed dude on the front cover No Limit graphically inspired Rap. To me, the fact that there is plenty of T.I., Jeezy, Clipse, and Game left on the shelf also proves something.

    Where exactly do you live?

    Yeah, in NY it's nothing but white rappers and dudes that were signed to a major label a decade ago and then released half a dozen albums independently chronicling their ass-hurt over having been dropped.

    Faux,

    Why you gotta call out Black Sheep like that?

  • deejdeej 5,125 Posts
    Yeah, in NY it's nothing but white rappers and dudes that were signed to a major label a decade ago and then released half a dozen albums independently chronicling their ass-hurt over having been dropped.
    haha. chicago is mostly west coast gangsta dudes from the early-mid 90s who can't move units on their new albums no matter how many other west coast gangsta dudes from the early-mid 90s they record with. I.E. new MC Eiht and Spice 1 and C-Bo records that came out since 2000

  • faux_rillzfaux_rillz 14,343 Posts
    Tower Records is in the process of shutting down. Right now, all Rap and hip hop cd's can be picked up for $1.50. The lowest price out of anything at the store, and really it just isn't selling. Just yesterday I copped a few hip hop cd's. Most of the real headz Hip-hop is gone. Any current chart Rappers are still there. There's a vast amount of this tattoed dude on the front cover No Limit graphically inspired Rap. To me, the fact that there is plenty of T.I., Jeezy, Clipse, and Game left on the shelf also proves something.

    Where exactly do you live?

    Yeah, in NY it's nothing but white rappers and dudes that were signed to a major label a decade ago and then released half a dozen albums independently chronicling their ass-hurt over having been dropped.

    Faux,

    Why you gotta call out Black Sheep like that?

    Haha... is that album even available anywhere but Dres's MySpace page?

  • deejdeej 5,125 Posts
    Dres
    can still rap

  • noznoz 3,625 Posts
    dc and va towers are/were backpack rap heaven - louis logic, soul position, atmosphere, etc.

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts


    I'm not worried about convincing Archaic - I already know were RG is at as far as my work is concerned. But it concerns me that other people wading into this mess will think that I tried to write a history of crack rap piece when that is most certainly NOT what I do in said piece.

    I don't mind people debating the merits of my argument otherwise.

    All this personal shit is trash but I think everyone sees that for what it is.

    Personal stuff???

    Saying that you aren't qualified to properly write about crack-related rap is solely based on the fact that the brunt of your past work actively attempts to ignore the topic.

    Am I really off-base with that?

  • faux_rillzfaux_rillz 14,343 Posts
    dc and va towers are/were backpack rap heaven - louis logic, soul position, atmosphere, etc.

    "To me, that proves something...."




  • my 2 cents:

    jeezy and clipse are selling, in part, due to an image that has nothing to do with how well they can rap. there are plenty of rappers who sell millions without ever voicing any real opinions because everyone (i'm sure) would agree that you can be a great rapper without voicing social or political commentary.

    "crack rap" is a voluntary choice by artists to seperate themselves from party raps and bragadocia. artists like jeezy and the clipse are in it for the money. if rapping about baking donuts made them money, the new jeezy album would have a song dedicated to french cruellers.

    the fact that these albums are selling so well is more of a commentary on us as consumers than it is about them. the buyer determines the market.

    Have you even heard the Clipse album? It's a defiantly noncommercial effort. And it's not selling very well, either.

    are you trying to say that the group who promotes hustling put out an album with the intent that it would not sell? please. just because they didn't make party records doesn't mean it wasn't a commercial effort. their music is part of the overall package of how they are marketing themselves. either they think they have a special skill for crack raps or they believe there is a strong market for it. its one of the two...or both. the fact that there aren't a lot of radio friendly tracks was not an intentional move to make less money.

    again, i'm not casting judgment on them, i just think this whole topic is filled with wasted arguments. there is a market for this music, that's the only reason why it exists. o-dub's article basically pointed out the obvious, that the market is growing, and imo, that point is indisputable (rap has grown, so even if crack rap was always around, it has piggy-backed on the success of hip hop as a genre).

  • deejdeej 5,125 Posts

    my 2 cents:

    jeezy and clipse are selling, in part, due to an image that has nothing to do with how well they can rap. there are plenty of rappers who sell millions without ever voicing any real opinions because everyone (i'm sure) would agree that you can be a great rapper without voicing social or political commentary.

    "crack rap" is a voluntary choice by artists to seperate themselves from party raps and bragadocia. artists like jeezy and the clipse are in it for the money. if rapping about baking donuts made them money, the new jeezy album would have a song dedicated to french cruellers.

    the fact that these albums are selling so well is more of a commentary on us as consumers than it is about them. the buyer determines the market.

    Have you even heard the Clipse album? It's a defiantly noncommercial effort. And it's not selling very well, either.

    are you trying to say that the group who promotes hustling put out an album with the intent that it would not sell? please. just because they didn't make party records doesn't mean it wasn't a commercial effort. their music is part of the overall package of how they are marketing themselves. either they think they have a special skill for crack raps or they believe there is a strong market for it. its one of the two...or both. the fact that there aren't a lot of radio friendly tracks was not an intentional move to make less money.

    again, i'm not casting judgment on them, i just think this whole topic is filled with wasted arguments. there is a market for this music, that's the only reason why it exists. o-dub's article basically pointed out the obvious, that the market is growing, and imo, that point is indisputable (rap has grown, so even if crack rap was always around, it has piggy-backed on the success of hip hop as a genre).
    do any artists put out a CD with the intent that it won't sell?

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    Here's an off-board response (not mine) to ODub's article...

    I love articles like these, written by out-of-touch music critics who listen to a couple mixtapes and think they know about the hood. It's like they're sayin', "Yes, there's drugs being sold in the hood, but what REALLY pisses me off is when people from the hood point it out!! What gives these former drug dealers the right to point out reality, like they're all better than me? Fuck them."

    It makes no sense. Art imitates life, not the other way around. If "coke rap" or "D-boy rap" is the new trend, then maybe there's a bigger trend goin' on in the streets that influence these rappers. Where I live at, Jeezy is everyone's favorite rapper. But, it's not because they wanna be like him............it's because they ARE like him. He raps about what they live through everyday. Crack is being sold. Crack is being used. Money is being made.

  • faux_rillzfaux_rillz 14,343 Posts

    my 2 cents:

    jeezy and clipse are selling, in part, due to an image that has nothing to do with how well they can rap. there are plenty of rappers who sell millions without ever voicing any real opinions because everyone (i'm sure) would agree that you can be a great rapper without voicing social or political commentary.

    "crack rap" is a voluntary choice by artists to seperate themselves from party raps and bragadocia. artists like jeezy and the clipse are in it for the money. if rapping about baking donuts made them money, the new jeezy album would have a song dedicated to french cruellers.

    the fact that these albums are selling so well is more of a commentary on us as consumers than it is about them. the buyer determines the market.

    Have you even heard the Clipse album? It's a defiantly noncommercial effort. And it's not selling very well, either.

    are you trying to say that the group who promotes hustling put out an album with the intent that it would not sell? please. just because they didn't make party records doesn't mean it wasn't a commercial effort. their music is part of the overall package of how they are marketing themselves. either they think they have a special skill for crack raps or they believe there is a strong market for it. its one of the two...or both. the fact that there aren't a lot of radio friendly tracks was not an intentional move to make less money.

    Is "intent that the album not sell" or "intentional moves to make less money" your standard for labelling an album "noncommercial"? If so, then there have been virtually no noncommercial albums in the history of rap.

    It's beyond me how anybody could hear this album and think that their primary goal--the one to which they subordinated artistic considerations--was selling records. I think that they made the album that they were determined to make with full awareness that they were not crafting a chart topper.



  • Is "intent that the album not sell" or "intentional moves to make less money" your standard for labelling an album "noncommercial"? If so, then there have been virtually no noncommercial albums in the history of rap.

    It's beyond me how anybody could hear this album and think that their primary goal--the one to which they subordinated artistic considerations--was selling records. I think that they made the album that they were determined to make with full awareness that they were not crafting a chart topper.

    you are missing the point. the clipse are niche rappers. if they could sell like 50 cent and put out an album full of party anthems, they would. what do you base their artistic integrity on? and if we assume they had the ability to craft a chart topping album, what is the artistry that they are protecting by not doing so? they are rapping about selling drugs, but what is the message? if anything, it is intentionally cryptic.
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