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vinyl to mp3 question

ArtichokeArtichoke 112 Posts
edited November 2007 in Strut Central
well im finally getting the Microwave and was wondering how everyone rips there vinyl to get the best quality mp3help a brother out and you will be blessed with some mp3 heatery when im up and running

  Comments



  • the most important thing is your signal chain. good needles, decent mixer, etc.

    microwave has a built in recording feature, but I don't use it much. I prefer to rip records to an audio cd and then import. It is basically the same, except this way I have a hard copy just in case...

    hope this helps. have fun with that shit.

  • Do people really have bad luck with this? I go from turntable > $10 pre-amp (cigar box size) > PC (line-in), using regular audio cables.

    Everything sounds great. And I have an old ass Vaio circa '00.

  • spelunkspelunk 3,400 Posts
    Depends how picky you are. If you think your DJ mixer sounds fine, just run it through there and into a soundcard.

    Personally, I use Shure whitelabels, use the phono preamps in my mixer (Allen & Heath Xone 02), then into my soundcard (Echo Layla 24) using redco cables (not some audiophile BS, just well-built).

    I like the idea of ripping to CD but I'm just not that organized.

    Some people use audiophile/listening carts to rip vinyl, but IMO when microwaving you want the records to sound as if you were actually playing them live, so using your preferred DJing cartridge makes more sense to me.

  • what software do you use microwave or otherwise?


  • the most important thing is your signal chain. good needles, decent mixer, etc.
    that's word!

    a good sound card helps too.

    i record straight into soundforge.
    i used to record at 24 bit and a higher sample rate, then take it down to 16 bit (44,100 sample rate). but that just took too long although it sounded really good. then just save out as a 320 kb mp3.


  • Some people use audiophile/listening carts to rip vinyl, but IMO when microwaving you want the records to sound as if you were actually playing them live, so using your preferred DJing cartridge makes more sense to me.

    Yeah, but a lot of DJ cartridges add more on the low end, so if you record them with that and then play them in S.erato with the control record on the needle you recorded it with, the song can sound kind of muddy.

  • ostost Montreal 1,375 Posts
    well im finally getting the Microwave and was wondering how everyone rips there vinyl to get the best quality mp3


    help a brother out and you will be blessed with some mp3 heatery when im up and running
    I recently did this with about 150 songs and was going insane:
    first because it takes forevere and second because I had some serious issues with my brand new software. In the end I was able to make everything sound right.
    I use cubase to record the tracks because the thing is you want to be able to control the audio quality(encoding , etc..) and also edit your tracks. For example , if there are noticeable clicks from the vinyl you can cut them and you can even eq a little if the 12" you're ripping has too much bass or not enough, etc... Another thing I find is really important is panning. I don't about anybody else here but I go insane when I'm listening to a song via headphones and it sounds a lot louder in one channel so with the software if thats the case I can add gain to left or right channel independatly or just export the track as mono ...

  • The-gafflerThe-gaffler 2,190 Posts
    shure m447 > pmc 05 > phono out > garageband > record away.

    sounds good enough for me. comes out real crisp on CD. that's the only reason i use it though is to put tracks onto a CD, to the pod, or for ripping tapes to mp3

    microwave: do not want

  • djkingottodjkingotto 1,704 Posts

    I prefer to rip records to an audio cd and then import.

    when i first got micro this is how i imported music. then my laptop died! when i bought a new laptop i already 1000+ songs to upload instantly instead of recording them all in real time. sooooo glad i did that. however, i've been spending my free time recording directly into peak now so i won't have that hard copy should something happen.

  • jaymackjaymack 5,198 Posts
    help a brother out and you will be blessed with some mp3 heatery when im up and running

  • NutsNuts 44 Posts
    Co-sign on the signal chain. It's never better than the weakest link.
    The better the stylus, pre-amp and AD-converters, the better the high and lo-end of the soundfiles. If you're just going to transfer them to mp3, it's probably no biggie, but if you're planning on flac or wav, then it might be worth looking further into.
    I use both cubase and adobe audition for recording, but I find adobe audition (cool edit) a little quicker to work with. I use a bit of waves noise reduction pack if it's needed, but don't overdo it. I usually normalize the tracks and add a little soft compression on top.
    Having a couple of presets ready will speed up the workflow, but ripping vinyl takes forever.
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