current film strut

1235»

  Comments


  • I went to the Boston location back in the day, as a sort of pilgrimage the first time I ever went to the east coast. I'd been receiving their weekly email of new releases (with realaudio links, fer chrissakes) for years at that point and was dying to go. Weirdly never made it to the NYC shop. Not sure I want to see a bunch of 2000s indie darlings big it up onscreen for two hours, but it was a good shop (and not just for indie).

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    Saw Lynn + Lucy recently.  Really interesting.  Felt like something in the Dardenne Bros universe.



  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    Not a film, but also loving I May Destroy You by Michaela Coel.  Would love to see a film from her.

  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,474 Posts
    I remember just before the 'rona took control, there was a comedy about a suicide bathtub that looked great, but it seems to have vanished (or at least never made it to Nextflick). Anyone remember the name of this? Seen it?

  • ElectrodeElectrode Los Angeles 2,822 Posts
    I remember just before the 'rona took control, there was a comedy about a suicide bathtub that looked great, but it seems to have vanished (or at least never made it to Nextflick). Anyone remember the name of this? Seen it?

    Sounds like "Seven Stages To Achieve Eternal Bliss". I've never seen it, though.

    https://m.imdb.com/title/tt4270452/

    Duderonomy

  • dizzybulldizzybull Eerie Dicks 179 Posts
    I finally watched the green inferno on Netflix. Like most Eli Roth movies it was 85 minutes of “meh” and 5 minutes of comedy genius. It’s those five minutes that keep me coming back. 

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts


    I actually went to the cinema last week to see First Cow - only 4 of us in the theatre, so not hard to social distance!  Anyway, I really enjoyed it.  Another slo-mo classic from Kelly R.  I won't say much more but it takes place in the early 1800s and seemed to explore proto-capitalism.  I'm reading the book it's based on now (The Half Life).



  • ketan said:


    I actually went to the cinema last week to see First Cow - only 4 of us in the theatre, so not hard to social distance!  Anyway, I really enjoyed it.  Another slo-mo classic from Kelly R.  I won't say much more but it takes place in the early 1800s and seemed to explore proto-capitalism.  I'm reading the book it's based on now (The Half Life).


    Hey my dude Orion Lee is one of the leads in this! I am so vicariously proud of him - worked on some short comedy films/web series with him, then did a double-take when I saw him in a small part in Star Wars, and now this. Haven't seen it yet but I've enjoyed every film of Reichardt's that I've seen.


  • dizzybulldizzybull Eerie Dicks 179 Posts
    I’m trying to watch Da Five Bloods but it frankly isn’t that good. Spike Lee frustrates me... Do the Right Thing and Malcolm X are masterpieces to me, so he is capable of genius but also capable of turds. 

    Changing gears, I also watched The Weather Underground on YouTube and that was great. The background music hasn’t aged well but the movie itself was great, and relevant for the times we find ourselves in today. 


    Also started rewatching House of 1000 Corpses for the first time since it came out. Is it a statement on class warfare? Or is it just a laugh? Or maybe both?

  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,474 Posts
    dizzybull said:
    I’m trying to watch Da Five Bloods but it frankly isn’t that good. Spike Lee frustrates me... Do the Right Thing and Malcolm X are masterpieces to me, so he is capable of genius but also capable of turds. 

    DTRT is bona fide classic from Spike, but I think my favourite of his is Summer Of Sam. Great cast, looks authentic (as far as I know!), and I think it’s a novel take on a serial killer story to focus entirely on the people and their stories. Amid the chaos of murders and the blackouts, there’s a constant oppressive theme of tension. Oh, and I LOL’d when the dog talks.


    Black Klansman was really good, but not as powerful as I think the film wanted itself to be... the best parts were the idiocy of the white racists, but overall nothing really stayed with me. I’m not sure his best directing days aren’t behind him. He still makes watchable films, but not great ones.

    On a tangent, he was recently doing a write-in Q&A on the Guardian, and along with a lot of very non-committal comments re:BLM, he said a few things that surprised me for their ignorance/parochialism: the one that really comes to mind was when asked what USA could do/have done better to mend post slavery race relations, his response was to ask which countries have done better. Really? Better question is which countries have done worse... a much shorter list.


  • MondeyanoMondeyano Reykjavik 845 Posts
    Watched Tenet and loved and hated it. Too damn complex for a simple night out to the movies.

    But, the night after that I watched Bill & Ted: Face The Music and it was pretty awesome.

    Both films great in their own right (former in production quality and braininess, latter in fun) so I'll recommend both.

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    ketan said:


    I actually went to the cinema last week to see First Cow - only 4 of us in the theatre, so not hard to social distance!  Anyway, I really enjoyed it.  Another slo-mo classic from Kelly R.  I won't say much more but it takes place in the early 1800s and seemed to explore proto-capitalism.  I'm reading the book it's based on now (The Half Life).


    Hey my dude Orion Lee is one of the leads in this! I am so vicariously proud of him - worked on some short comedy films/web series with him, then did a double-take when I saw him in a small part in Star Wars, and now this. Haven't seen it yet but I've enjoyed every film of Reichardt's that I've seen.

    he was great!  dude is buck nekkid in his opening scene btw.  


  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    Mondeyano said:
    Watched Tenet and loved and hated it. Too damn complex for a simple night out to the movies.

    But, the night after that I watched Bill & Ted: Face The Music and it was pretty awesome.

    Both films great in their own right (former in production quality and braininess, latter in fun) so I'll recommend both.


    saw Tenet and it was incomprehensible yet totally watchable* for 2.5 hours - not sure how Nolan pulled that off.  john david washington (from Black Klansman) was a great anti-Bond.  

    * we saw it in IMAX and the sound mix was garbage - could NOT understand chunks of dialogue here and there.  i read that's not the case with 70mm and other versions.


  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    TIFF is coming up in Toronto and they've got a pretty big slate of films avaialble to stream online in place of a physical screening.  I'm watching Memory House and A Suitable Boy.  It would be amazing if they did that regularly/moving forward.  



  • Yeah lots of festivals seem to be adapting that way. I support it, although I also really don't want to see cinemas die out. The experience is special, and I'm one of those festival nerds who spends a week researching the program and buys tickets to 3 movies a day when a big festival is on, so I see a lot of in-person Q&As and stuff too.

    Just watched a strange Portuguese musical on MUBI, "Technoboss", which was about an old guy who owns a security alarm/door lock company... weird vibe... the guy sings in his car mostly, between jobs, and the genres range from like samba pop to death metal? No ringing endorsement from me but it was definitely like no musical I've seen.

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    klezmer electro-thug beats said:
    Yeah lots of festivals seem to be adapting that way. I support it, although I also really don't want to see cinemas die out. The experience is special, and I'm one of those festival nerds who spends a week researching the program and buys tickets to 3 movies a day when a big festival is on, so I see a lot of in-person Q&As and stuff too.

    I do love going all in on a film fest, but ever since we had kids, I can only pull off a few actual screenings/events. So until babysitters are not  needed, virtual screenings are more my lane!

    Saw Memory House and it's a deep one.  Slow but eventful.  Dark but amusing.  Has a very unique sense of spirituality.  Not perfect but wholly original. 

    Gonna watch Limbo this Friday after the 5 star review in the Guardian.

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    It wears its influences on it's sleeve but Limbo is a real gem.  Very funny and very sad.

  • That looks great - weirdly stars another guy whose smaller-time work I've edited, Amir El-Masry - didn't meet the dude on the project though. If you knew how few scripted (i.e. with actors) things I've worked on this would seem like quite a pair of coincidences I swear

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    A couple of great flicks I saw recently via a local online film fest... 

    Golden Bear winner There Is No Evil is a potent series of short stories about capital punishment in Iran - more about the impacts on people involved in the system rather than the people being offed. 

    My Name is Baghdad is a very rad Brazilian flick about a skater girl that has a totally refreshing soundtrack.  Pity there's no plans to release an OST at this point.

    I don't know quite what this film is about (not going to read the reviews) but the trailer looks great: 

  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,474 Posts
    Netflix:

    Chicago 7 thing was good. Borat had some good lines even if his accent was terrrrrible. Keaton owned it in his brief cameo.

    Enola Holmes: 7 from Stranger Things proving that she’s more than just staring hard at things and getting a nose bleed. She’s actually a really really great actor.

    Not new but The True History Of The Kelly Gang is good, even if it follows the Mel Gibson tradition of black&white-all-badguys-are-English, the-English-are-evil casting even if it’s out of synch with source material (in this case a book, in Gibson’s case reality). I find Ozzie films are usually really good if for no other reason than the locations available, and this is no exception. Stunning landscapes!

  • JimsterJimster Twilight Zone/ Al Capone/ Rolling Stone/ Eva Perón 6,433 Posts
    Speaking of Gibson, I saw a review of Fatman which said the trailer was better than the film.  I dunno, I guess his ego is too big to express any kind of contrition in his work, but the way he flushed his reputation down the crappper, I'd have expected him to be trying harder.

  • MondeyanoMondeyano Reykjavik 845 Posts
    Everyone needs to see this one now.



    It's insane, part (100%) documentary, part spy thriller. And it's all real.
    Shot over a period of 10+ years.
    Highest recommendation.
    Jimsterklezmer electro-thug beatsDuderonomy

  • dizzybulldizzybull Eerie Dicks 179 Posts
    Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom. I was disappointed. Love the music of that era, stellar cast, but damn it was so “Stagey” it was like watching a play. So I looked it up, and it was indeed a play. Not that plays can’t turn into good movies but this wasn’t it. Rip black panther. 



  • That's a bit of a shame if it's Chad Boseman's last movie, but then there was that creepy announcement from marvel saying they'd make another Black Panther movie without recasting him - presumably by some kind of Paul Walker/Carrie Fisher CGI abomination technique? Not sure that's got potential to be a better swansong...

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    ppadilha said:
    Knives Out - was pretty tight, feel like I haven't seen a movie like that in a while where everything is just solid. I saw it with my mom, I'd say it's a good movie to take your mom to see.

    Only just saw this recently and it's exactly what Hollywood fluff should be.  (I loved it.)


    Duderonomy

  • FrankFrank 2,403 Posts

    New-ish, not really current but hugely enjoyable.

    ketan

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    Nice, I've been wanting to see Monos.  Did you see Bacurau, Frank?  You might like it.


    ppadilha

  • I saw Monos and Laissez bronzer les cadavres at the London film festival last year, both were dope!! The filmmakers of Laissez... were there and like 80% of the audience questions after the screening were about the soundtrack.

    I saw the absolutely bizarre thing where Barack Obama puts out a list of all the movies and TV he's liked for the year, and he mentioned the Russian movie Beanpole, which I also saw at the last festival. It's "inspired" by a book I love, The Unwomanly Face of War/War's Unwomanly Face. I kind of don't believe he'd watch that and put it on his list... it's a pretty brutal watch, emotionally. But very good.

  • FrankFrank 2,403 Posts
    Yeah, Bacurau was great, Udo Kier kills it. I remember I tried to find a download for Beanpole a while back but couldn't find a place to steal it from.

  • ketanketan Warmly booming riffs 2,724 Posts
    Mondeyano said:
    Everyone needs to see this one now.



    It's insane, part (100%) documentary, part spy thriller. And it's all real.
    Shot over a period of 10+ years.
    Highest recommendation.

    I'm halfway through this - I remember seeing The Ambassador, which treads similar territory.  But this is another level given the length of the game, the setting, and the fact that this guy apparently undertook this of his own fanboy volition... I kinda suspect Mads hired him for it, but regardless, it seems insane to try this.


    I can't wait to find out his wife's reaction!  

Sign In or Register to comment.