Trip Hop & da 90s revival.

OkemOkem 4,617 Posts
edited July 2011 in Strut Central
It's not like trip hop ever really went away, but as the rehashing of the 80s becomes a distant memory, the logical progression moves towards a similar rinsing of the 90s musical forms. Do you think this stuff will actually become big again?

Exhibit a. Emeli Sand??


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  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 7,787 Posts
    A lot of the mellower dubstep stuff is kind of trip-hop, no? Mount Kimbie for example?

  • Definitely sensing a big revival of schitt from da 90's. 90's Hip Hop, 90's Indie Rock (between the ATCQ Documentary and Various "Reunion Shows" from favorite 90's bands), makes sense "Trip Hop" would come back into fashion as well.
    Speaking of which... I've been re-listening to a bunch of Long Fin Killie/Bows lately....









    :feelin_it:

  • mrmatthewmrmatthew 1,575 Posts
    I always thought this tune sounded a bit "trip-hop-py"



  • jjfad027jjfad027 1,594 Posts
    Okem said:
    It's not like trip hop ever really went away

    Yeah I've always been keen to this stuff. I hate the term triphop though. More partial to Blazing Downtempo

  • jjfad027jjfad027 1,594 Posts
    http://www.megaupload.com/?d=TO2BGQAB

    here's mix I did some years ago. Let me know if anyone wants a higher quality

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    Okem said:
    Do you think this stuff will actually become big again?

    I don't think it was ever big in the US.

    b/w

    Thank, Gawd!

  • OkemOkem 4,617 Posts
    Okem said:
    I always thought Blazing Downtempo was meant to be a belittling term.

    -

    What ever you want to call it, it's something I have no problem with admitting I have enjoyed and still do at times. Things like MoWax, Soul II Soul, Portishead & Massive Attack played a big part in my musical upbringing (? maybe that's not the right word, but you know what I mean). But I also understand that the genre has its pitfalls and the music can become generic and pedestrian all to easily.

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    Portishead was actually big. And I can still listen to them today. Anytime I try to revisit Massive Attack, I die of boredom.

  • OkemOkem 4,617 Posts
    I guess it's one of those things, like the Aussie hip hop, that thrives further from the source, as it doesn't have to compete in the same space.

    But the musical map is a lot different these days. You could look on the Whinehouse's or Adele's as descendants, or maybe distant relatives, of the genre, and they've crossed the Atlantic pretty successfully.

  • OkemOkem 4,617 Posts
    double.

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    Okem said:
    You could look on the Whinehouse's or Adele's as descendants, or maybe distant relatives, of the genre, and they've crossed the Atlantic pretty successfully.

    Have they?

    Not to my eyes/ears, but people say I live in a trench.

  • OkemOkem 4,617 Posts
    HarveyCanal said:
    Okem said:
    You could look on the Whinehouse's or Adele's as descendants, or maybe distant relatives, of the genre, and they've crossed the Atlantic pretty successfully.

    Have they?

    Not to my eyes/ears, but people say I live in a trench.
    I can only presume, by the amount of attention she gets on here, that Whinehouse has done ok over there.

    Adele, who I personally have little interest in, has more recently had pretty good mainstream success in the US (from wiki) "In the US the album ('21') has spent a total of nine weeks at the top of the Billboard 200 to date."

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    i cant mess w Trip Hop but i have a gang of Electronica that still feels good.

    I dont see "proper" Trip Hop having a resergence, but 90s shit ............well see.

  • AKallDayAKallDay 830 Posts
    90's revival/nostalgia movement has actively been here for a bit now.

    loved portishead and i also can still listen to it.

    but trip hop was always corny to me then and now. it's default yoga class music to me.

  • DocMcCoyDocMcCoy "Go and laugh in your own country!" 5,917 Posts
    I've never had any issue with instrumental hip-hop - nobody seemed to mind when albums always used to have a token DJ feature on them - but there seemed to be a subtext with the widespread embrace of trip-hop which said, "At last we can pay lipservice to hip-hop without all that troublesome black nationalist baggage or the scary gangsta stuff." The guys in Massive Attack weren't particularly good rappers (still aren't), but at least you weren't in any doubt that what they did had its roots in a hip-hop aesthetic. With the odd exception, all the other shit that came afterwards - for which Massive, Coldcut et al don't deserve the blame - was hip muzak that was only ever of interest to a handful of music supes.

    I remember saying to someone in '93 or '94 - whenever it was that "In/Flux" came out - that if James Lavelle could sell Shadow to the kids who listened to Pink Floyd, he'd be laughing all the way to the bank. That's kind of what happened, I reckon.

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    Massive Attack doesn't deserve a pass on that. Their only lasting redeeming quality was putting Horace Andy on their albums. Nobody in the US came anywhere close to liking any Massive Attack songs with their in-crew rappers on them. In other words, we liked them only because they drew allusions to dub and not because they were somehow rooted in hip-hop.

  • asstroasstro 1,754 Posts
    I don't listen to it often, but there will always be a place for Portishead and Massive Attack in my music collection. The vast majority of "trip hop" was painfully bland though, music for car commercials and coffeeshops.

    I do like that Submotion Orchestra vid linked above though, curious to hear more of that.

  • bassiebassie 11,710 Posts
    Okem said:
    It's not like trip hop ever really went away

    there will always be a need in the world for muzak.

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts


    OOF

  • DocMcCoyDocMcCoy "Go and laugh in your own country!" 5,917 Posts
    HarveyCanal said:
    Massive Attack doesn't deserve a pass on that. Their only lasting redeeming quality was putting Horace Andy on their albums. Nobody in the US came anywhere close to liking any Massive Attack songs with their in-crew rappers on them. In other words, we liked them only because they drew allusions to dub and not because they were somehow rooted in hip-hop.

    Well, I wouldn't know (nor would I care) how Massive Attack were viewed in the US, but they were very much of hip-hop, even if they weren't hip-hop in the strictest sense. They weren't copying anybody, they never tried to be American, and their stuff drew on punk and new wave as much as it did rap and soundboy culture. There was an originality in their approach that was completely absent from the copyists, and so I refuse to hold them responsible for all the lousy trip-hop that came in their wake. That'd be like saying all the crummy bands that copied Sabbath or Zeppelin somehow made Sabbath or Zeppelin crummy bands too, which is just crazy talk.

  • trzakhstantrzakhstan IA 198 Posts
    Thievery Corporation just dropped a new album, DJ Cam has new stuff, Shadow has an album out later this summer.



  • bassiebassie 11,710 Posts
    DocMcCoy said:
    HarveyCanal said:
    Massive Attack doesn't deserve a pass on that. Their only lasting redeeming quality was putting Horace Andy on their albums. Nobody in the US came anywhere close to liking any Massive Attack songs with their in-crew rappers on them. In other words, we liked them only because they drew allusions to dub and not because they were somehow rooted in hip-hop.

    Well, I wouldn't know (nor would I care) how Massive Attack were viewed in the US, but they were very much of hip-hop, even if they weren't hip-hop in the strictest sense. They weren't copying anybody, they never tried to be American, and their stuff drew on punk and new wave as much as it did rap and soundboy culture. There was an originality in their approach that was completely absent from the copyists, and so I refuse to hold them responsible for all the lousy trip-hop that came in their wake. That'd be like saying all the crummy bands that copied Sabbath or Zeppelin somehow made Sabbath or Zeppelin crummy bands too, which is just crazy talk.

    Horace Andy being on Blue Lines is a nice add, but hardly what made the whole thing. To Doc's point, I wouldn't know where to put it - even today - other than to say it's a terrificly atmospheric and soulful record.

  • DocMcCoyDocMcCoy "Go and laugh in your own country!" 5,917 Posts
    That 'Def Surrounds Us' thing Shadow had out last year was fucking atrocious, but a couple of the other things I've heard - I've Been Trying and I Gotta Rock (I think that's what it's called) - are both really good.

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    Not saying they're responsible for all the chud beyond them. I'm saying they don't deserve a pass for being hip-hop lite. For as Batmon posted, their whole steez had already been covered by a single one-minute De La interlude. All that influenced by punk and such talk is just long-winded Brit wank.

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    bassie said:
    DocMcCoy said:
    HarveyCanal said:
    Massive Attack doesn't deserve a pass on that. Their only lasting redeeming quality was putting Horace Andy on their albums. Nobody in the US came anywhere close to liking any Massive Attack songs with their in-crew rappers on them. In other words, we liked them only because they drew allusions to dub and not because they were somehow rooted in hip-hop.

    Well, I wouldn't know (nor would I care) how Massive Attack were viewed in the US, but they were very much of hip-hop, even if they weren't hip-hop in the strictest sense. They weren't copying anybody, they never tried to be American, and their stuff drew on punk and new wave as much as it did rap and soundboy culture. There was an originality in their approach that was completely absent from the copyists, and so I refuse to hold them responsible for all the lousy trip-hop that came in their wake. That'd be like saying all the crummy bands that copied Sabbath or Zeppelin somehow made Sabbath or Zeppelin crummy bands too, which is just crazy talk.

    Horace Andy being on Blue Lines is a nice add, but hardly what made the whole thing. To Doc's point, I wouldn't know where to put it - even today - other than to say it's a terrificly atmospheric and soulful record.

    Like dub.

  • bassiebassie 11,710 Posts
    OK...and?

    Please see Doc's is of it, even if it is not exactly it comment. We're talking in circles now.

  • HarveyCanalHarveyCanal "a distraction from my main thesis." 13,234 Posts
    I'm still upset about being really excited to see Massive Attack with Horace Andy in tow as one of the headliners at ACL Fest a few years back only to be greeted by one of the most fabulously boring shows I have ever witnessed. I'm talking made me want to slit my wrists boring...you know, like a Tortoise show.

    So here I am today capping on them, the miniscule shelf-life of their albums, and anyone who attempts to make them out to be anything grander than a long wait in line at the bank.

    I'll stop now though.
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