Saba = Unemployed

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  • LaserWolfLaserWolf Portland Oregon 11,518 Posts
    Any one here who does not make 150,000 or more a year should start asking for a raise. You know you are worth more than Saba.

    Wow.....I didn't realize you pulled in that kind of cash....what else do you do besides selling records to get paid??

    Not me. I don't get paid, I sell records.
    But if I work a clerk at a record store I would show the owner this thread and demand more money.
    Or better yet, I would demand to be laid off for a year at half pay.

  • The interest on a subsidized stafford loan is not only de minimis, but it doesnt even begin to accrue until six months after I graduate. I invested the money and made enough money to buy myself several Orlann Divo OGs.



    Some Duke & Duke moves right there.


    that's whats up! ETHER THESE BITCHEZ!

  • GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts
    The interest on a subsidized stafford loan is not only de minimis, but it doesnt even begin to accrue until six months after I graduate. I invested the money and made enough money to buy myself several Orlann Divo OGs.



    Some Duke & Duke moves right there.


    that's whats up! ETHER THESE BITCHEZ!

    Ehhh I think that's actually against the terms of the gov't-backed student loans numbnuts.

  • BurnsBurns 2,227 Posts
    Dude, I almost hope the economy gets bad enough so that people like you have to actually get their hands dirty and sore with some real physical labor...

    As others have said before, this thread nicely illuminates what's wrong with the way the coorporate world handles its money and their shameless attitude about it.


    saba- why do i get the sense that the only reason for this thread is so that you can gloat about getting $75 k for doing no work. as you say, the 75k is a gift, even if you decide to take another job. so, shouldn't we really be saying F*ck you, you lucky bastard???

  • I hope you fail the bar and that your offer is rescinded.

    Ha ha Saba you can't even be an overpaid drone lackey buttlicker correctly! You lose at life! You and tons of other marginally intelligent people who were willing to give up any semblance of an interesting career in exchange for a six figure salary are going to be SHIT OUT OF LUCK. I need a good file clerk if you're interested, but on second thought I think I'll hire someone who isn't a flaming asshole.

  • I think I'll hire someone who isn't a flaming asshole.


    can regular assholes like me apply? HOLLER AT THE GOD I GOT A DEGREE.

  • ReynaldoReynaldo 6,054 Posts
    I figured Saba was just acting like his favorite Texas rappers.

  • GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts
    I figured Saba was just acting like his favorite Texas rappers.

    He should spend all his money & unemployment on platinum fronts.

  • I figured Saba was just acting like his favorite Texas rappers.


    That's what I been saying. He's mad hip-hop right now. STUNTING, IT'S A HABIT GET LIKE HIM.

  • ReynaldoReynaldo 6,054 Posts

  • dj_netadj_neta 166 Posts
    Perspective?


    "$80,000 for a Year Off? She???ll Take It!"
    By SUSAN DOMINUS for The New York Times
    April 12, 2009[/b]

    This year may be a disastrous one for the global economy, but it???s shaping up to be one of the best that Heather Eisenlord has enjoyed in a good long while. Granted, that might not be saying much: For the past five years, Ms. Eisenlord has been an associate at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, a notably grueling place for a lawyer to work.

    But even by more stringent standards of fun, the coming year looks pretty good. Ms. Eisenlord, 36, who works in Skadden???s banking group, will be buying a plane ticket that will take her around the world for a year, and she???s been stocking her apartment in Brooklyn with Lonely Planet travel guides.

    Although she???s not yet sure exactly what she???ll be doing on her trip, she has some ideas. She would like to teach English to monks in Sri Lanka and possibly help bring solar power to remote parts of the Himalayas. She???ll probably hit 10 to 15 destinations around the world, most likely practicing not-for-profit law wherever she can be helpful.

    The best part of all: Skadden is paying her about $80,000 to do it.

    For a sixth-year associate at a New York law firm, $80,000 isn???t exactly competitive pay. But for someone cruising around the world, doing good wherever she sees fit and, let???s face it, probably hitting a beach or two, the pay is excellent.

    Only in a financial world turned upside down would an arrangement like this one make sense. Looking to cut costs like everyone else, but not prepared to lay off employees, Skadden has chosen instead to offer all of its associates ??? about 1,300 worldwide ??? the option of accepting a third of their base pay to not show up for work for a year. (So far, the partners have no equivalent arrangement.)

    The company is helping associates find pro bono work, and is encouraging them to do so. But the lawyers could also spend the year catching up on every episode of ???Top Chef??? that they missed during the boom years, or traveling around the world, ???all of which is O.K. by us,??? said Matthew Mallow, a partner at the firm. Other firms have adopted similar strategies, but Skadden???s program is unusual in that it has no pro bono requirements..

    As of Friday, about 125 associates had expressed interest. ???I think it???s fair to say that the numbers are in excess of our expectations,??? Mr. Mallow said.

    Only at a corporate law firm would the managers underestimate employees??? interest in taking a year off from the grind for what most of America would consider a small fortune.

    Not everyone could cover monthly living expenses on a third of one???s pay, and naturally some skeptical lawyers grilled the partners about job security. If there are layoffs in a year, they wondered, is it really possible that the lawyers who???d been defending trees in British Columbia wouldn???t be disadvantaged, compared with the lawyers who???d been slaving away on contracts in Midtown?

    Not only were the lawyers assured that their time away wouldn???t hurt them; in some ways it would be protective: If there are layoffs while they are away, they will be immune.

    So far, the majority of the lawyers are looking for worthwhile legal work, Skadden says, to keep them as competitive as possible; but yes, some will take the year off to spend time with their children or look after a sick relative. Someone???s planning to wrap up his Ph.D., someone else is looking into legal work for a news organization, and another associate will be joining Ms. Eisenlord on her round-the-world adventure.

    Ms. Eisenlord says she fully intends to go back to Skadden after her trip, and will be eager to return to the work she loves and the co-workers she admires. It???s possible that after a year teaching monks English, installing solar panels in the Himalayas and working on human rights in developing nations, she will come to the conclusion that there is no more fulfilling life than the one she has spent in corporate law.

    But maybe she will have some kind of revelation. If there is any silver lining to this financial catastrophe, it???s that business as usual has come to a grinding halt. Sometimes it takes getting thrown out of the office to notice there is a life outside.

    Already, Ms. Eisenlord seems to be making some sort of transition. Has she been getting any work done lately as she anticipates this thrilling new trip?

    ???No comment,??? she said.

    Spoken like a lawyer ??? but a lawyer on the verge.

  • selperfugeselperfuge 1,165 Posts
    weird. i know they got to protect their rep with the top schools but just giving away $80K to a 36 year old woman to not work for them? just fire her ass, she doesn't look partner track.

  • GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts
    weird. i know they got to protect their rep with the top schools but just giving away $80K to a 36 year old woman to not work for them? just fire her ass, she doesn't look partner track.





    Lois Lane track son!


  • no, don't. there are too many lawyers. ditch digging is a better career right now.[/b]




    15 years in the game you suckaz!

  • BigSpliffBigSpliff 3,266 Posts
    career

    I heard they are gonna drop this from the next run of Mirriam Webster's.

  • davesrecordsdavesrecords 1,802 Posts

    no, don't. there are too many lawyers. ditch digging is a better career right now.[/b]




    15 years in the game you suckaz!

    manual labor is not easy, that's why they call it manual labor...

  • davesrecordsdavesrecords 1,802 Posts

    no, don't. there are too many lawyers. ditch digging is a better career right now.[/b]




    15 years in the game you suckaz!

    perhaps a bit of back breaking work might help saba in the ole humility/empathy department.

  • sabadabadasabadabada 5,966 Posts

    no, don't. there are too many lawyers. ditch digging is a better career right now.[/b]




    15 years in the game you suckaz!

    perhaps a bit of back breaking work might help saba in the ole humility/empathy department.

    Saba is no stranger to hard work. In fact it was a combination of 33% hard work, 33% natural ability and above average intelligence, and 34% exceptionally good looks that got me where I am today. Or maybe it was 38% hard work, 31% ability 35% good looks. But whatever it was, it made me the man I am now. If you check my wikipedia page you will see, that I began working at age 12 carrying golf bags for $20 a loop, as a busboy and dishwasher, scraping barnacles off boat bottoms - where I began my life-long love affair with the sea, liquor store clerk, cookie baker, graveyard short-order cook at Sparky's Diner, mail jockey at PG&E and probably a few others I've repressed along the way. All for low pay, most involving a mop in some capacity.

  • GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts

    no, don't. there are too many lawyers. ditch digging is a better career right now.[/b]




    15 years in the game you suckaz!

    perhaps a bit of back breaking work might help saba in the ole humility/empathy department.

    Saba is no stranger to hard work. In fact it was a combination of 33% hard work, 33% natural ability and above average intelligence, and 34% exceptionally good looks that got me where I am today. Or maybe it was 38% hard work, 31% ability 35% good looks. But whatever it was, it made me the man I am now. If you check my wikipedia page you will see, that I began working at age 12 carrying golf bags for $20 a loop, as a busboy and dishwasher, scraping barnacles off boat bottoms - where I began my life-long love affair with the sea, liquor store clerk, cookie baker, graveyard short-order cook at Sparky's Diner, mail jockey at PG&E and probably a few others I've repressed along the way. All for low pay, most involving a mop in some capacity.

    Just hearing this makes me want to make love to your filly hole that much more.

  • saba is not good at life.
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