78rpm needle question

mistercmisterc 329 Posts
edited June 2005 in Strut Central
My grandfather passed (RIP) and in addition to some furniture he left me his records, many of which are 78s. I understand you need a 78 needle to play these.

questions:

There's no such thing as a 78 needle that would just screw into a modern day turntable tonearm is there?
Do I need to buy a needle or a new table equipped for this?

I have no idea. Basically I want to listen to these 78s, what's the best way to do it? I'm interested in sound quality up to about $200 (this is maximum and delayed gratification). Anything under $100 I could do when I get my next paycheck.

Thanks all

  Comments


  • LaserWolfLaserWolf Portland Oregon 11,518 Posts
    My grandfather passed (RIP) and in addition to some furniture he left me his records, many of which are 78s. I understand you need a 78 needle to play these.

    questions:

    There's no such thing as a 78 needle that would just screw into a modern day turntable tonearm is there?
    Do I need to buy a needle or a new table equipped for this?

    I have no idea. Basically I want to listen to these 78s, what's the best way to do it? I'm interested in sound quality up to about $200 (this is maximum and delayed gratification). Anything under $100 I could do when I get my next paycheck.

    Thanks all

    Sorry to hear about your grandfather.

    Does your turntable play at 78?

    Modern needles are much smaller than 78 needles, so they play in grooves that were never touched by the 78 needle. Thus a played out 78 would sound better with a modern needle.

    If the 78s are pre 1918 it is a good idea to get a crank machine.

    Do a google search for 78 enthusist site. It should not be hard to find what you need.

    Dan

  • GrafwritahGrafwritah 4,184 Posts
    There's no such thing as a 78 needle that would just screw into a modern day turntable tonearm is there?
    Do I need to buy a needle or a new table equipped for this?

    I have no idea. Basically I want to listen to these 78s, what's the best way to do it? I'm interested in sound quality up to about $200 (this is maximum and delayed gratification). Anything under $100 I could do when I get my next paycheck.

    Thanks all

    It depends (in a way) on what kind of 78s we're talking about. Either way you need a turntable that will play 78s, but if they're later 78s (like 40s-50s) you can at least play them on 78-compatible electronic turntable. If you're talking about earlier records from the Victrola era, you need an actual crank Victrola. Those use steel needles that are 2-use and then you pitch them. You can still get them from specialty dealers.


    Either way your biggest problem is that the turntable needs to be rotating at 78 RPMs which rules out a fix-all needle.

  • mistercmisterc 329 Posts
    My grandfather passed (RIP) and in addition to some furniture he left me his records, many of which are 78s. I understand you need a 78 needle to play these.

    questions:

    There's no such thing as a 78 needle that would just screw into a modern day turntable tonearm is there?
    Do I need to buy a needle or a new table equipped for this?

    I have no idea. Basically I want to listen to these 78s, what's the best way to do it? I'm interested in sound quality up to about $200 (this is maximum and delayed gratification). Anything under $100 I could do when I get my next paycheck.

    Thanks all

    Sorry to hear about your grandfather.

    Does your turntable play at 78?

    Modern needles are much smaller than 78 needles, so they play in grooves that were never touched by the 78 needle. Thus a played out 78 would sound better with a modern needle.

    If the 78s are pre 1918 it is a good idea to get a crank machine.

    Do a google search for 78 enthusist site. It should not be hard to find what you need.

    Dan

    Thanks. My table does play at 78. Most of his 78s are from the 1930s and 1940s and in VG+/M- condidtion. So would a modern needle make the sound muffled?

  • My Stanton turntable uses a separate 78RPM needle. It's pretty expensive too (around $60)

  • mistercmisterc 329 Posts
    My Stanton turntable uses a separate 78RPM needle. It's pretty expensive too (around $60)

    Wow, ya'll are replying faster than I can think. I think this the way. I have a Stanton table. Did you get this at a musical instrument store or online?
    Thanks everybody

  • My Stanton turntable uses a separate 78RPM needle. It's pretty expensive too (around $60)

    Wow, ya'll are replying faster than I can think. I think this the way. I have a Stanton table. Did you get this at a musical instrument store or online?
    Thanks everybody

    I got it on line, but I can't remember where (I bought two 78 styli more than a year ago and I'm nowhere near replacing them). I found the dealer doing a Google search...



  • That's the guy!

  • holmesholmes 3,532 Posts
    That Garage-A-Records place is great, I get most of the parts for my tables from there. I have a separate 1970s all-in-one record player unit that I use to play 78s since my modern tables don't have that speed, they sound good on that & the needles are reasonably priced.

  • FatbackFatback 6,746 Posts

    That's the guy!

    so...

    Under his Shure needles he says

    N44-3(4759-D3)
    (Generic)

    will work with
    M44, M55, M80E, M98A

    Has anyone used the 78 needle with M44-7s?
Sign In or Register to comment.