Breakface

DocBeezyDocBeezy 1,918 Posts
edited January 2006 in Strut Central
I finally saw a TRUE breakface last night. My boy got an mpc and needed some breaks to sample. I brought him about 10 breaks and as he played them his face puckered up,eyes squinted and let out a "OOOOOOOO"

  Comments


  • mylatencymylatency 10,475 Posts
    ban

  • 99Problems99Problems 1,541 Posts
    ban

  • DocBeezyDocBeezy 1,918 Posts
    ban

    what did I DO?

  • DocBeezyDocBeezy 1,918 Posts
    ban

  • knewjakknewjak 1,231 Posts
    ...has anyone witnessed 'the snaps' or 'the point'? (the breaksface' distance cousins).

  • DocBeezyDocBeezy 1,918 Posts
    ...has anyone witnessed 'the snaps' or 'the point'? (the breaksface' distance cousins).

    im assuming the point is when the record is pointed whilst playin?

    what is the snap?

  • ...has anyone witnessed 'the snaps' or 'the point'? (the breaksface' distance cousins).

    ban

  • ...has anyone witnessed 'the snaps' or 'the point'? (the breaksface' distance cousins).

    im assuming the point is when the record is pointed whilst playin?

    what is the snap?

    ban

  • DocBeezyDocBeezy 1,918 Posts
    ...has anyone witnessed 'the snaps' or 'the point'? (the breaksface' distance cousins).

    im assuming the point is when the record is pointed whilst playin?

    what is the snap?

    ban

    anything that is said in this thread will get a ban huh?

  • mylatencymylatency 10,475 Posts


    anything that is said in this thread will get a ban huh?

    puto
    BAN
    BAN

  • DocBeezyDocBeezy 1,918 Posts


    anything that is said in this thread will get a ban huh?

    puto
    BAN
    BAN

    did not see that coming.

  • AaronAaron 977 Posts
    "Snap moment" = "Oh snap!" ???

  • mylatencymylatency 10,475 Posts
    Hi. The punchout on the top is not a hole but a cut. It does not affect any of the contents of the set. The painting and record were luckily spared. The record smells of teen spirit: the indie 90's mystique captured in this monutmental 10 inch. It does not smell like a 2005 indie CD. It smells like what 2006 might smell like, I think. Aged to perfection. I handle all records with 100% washed and dryed hands, never dirty or dusty fingers on any covers or vinyl. I do this to protect my products and provide the highest quality items to my customers. Another fact about my business is I keep everything in a temperature controled, ventilated and air purified environment to prevent any damage or dust. This also keeps my items in pristine shape before they are mailed to you. I hope this answers some of your questions, feel free to ask me anything else about the record. Cheers!

  • DORDOR Two Ron Toe 9,900 Posts
    "Snap moment" = "Oh snap!" ???




  • How about the pre-break moment of Dead Concentration...the two obvious
    variants being the different faces on those who have already heard the
    break in its context, vs. those who know they are probably about to hear
    a break but haven't actually heard it yet.

    Sort of a mouth-breathing Thousand Yard Stare, possibly showing a
    little front teeth. This is the face's way of preparing all those
    tiny muscles to contract into an effective breakface.

  • DocBeezyDocBeezy 1,918 Posts


    Sort of a mouth-breathing Thousand Yard Stare, possibly showing a
    little front teeth. This is the face's way of preparing all those
    tiny muscles to contract into an effective breakface.

    classic!

  • BigSpliffBigSpliff 3,266 Posts
    "Snap moment" = "Oh snap!" ???

    Booyakkashaa!


  • DJPrestigeDJPrestige 1,710 Posts
    ban ban ban

  • SoulOnIceSoulOnIce 13,027 Posts
    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT SCROLLAMOUNT=15 BGCOLOR=YELLOW>So what is a break?

    The word ???break??? is short for breakbeat. Meaning a short section of a record that can be looped on a sampler to create a longer, seamless piece of music from this one section./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=GREEN SCROLLAMOUNT=40> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=BLUE>Why is it called a break?

    The term derives from the ???breakdown???, a part of a funk or disco record where most or all of the other instruments drop away, leaving the drummer, or maybe the drummer and percussionist, or drummer and bassist, to play their parts unaccompanied. This provides an instant rhythm section to create a new tune from./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT SCROLLAMOUNT=15 BGCOLOR=GREEN>How did it start?

    As a reaction to the sterility of major-label disco music in the mid-1970s. As a necessity for survival, many black bands turned to playing disco. Although disco had a big black audience, there remained a hardcore of funkers who felt it didn???t reflect their ghetto experience. So DJs like Kool Herc and Grandmaster Flash in the South Bronx and Brooklyn began to create their own funky sound by looping up breakdowns on two decks. What was originally a novelty became popular at street level. Other DJs would talk over them, influenced by reggae toasters (many early rappers had a Caribbean heritage, even if they were born in America themselves) and rap was born./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE BGCOLOR=YELLOW SCROLLAMOUNT=30> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=BLUE>What was the first break?

    That???s a moot point. James Brown put together a couple of records credited to ???Steve Soul??? in the early 1970s, which were basically edits of many of his records with an announcer talking over them. But the beat was by no means seamless. In 1973 Lee Perry created the first true hip-hop record, albeit with a reggae rhythm, when he edited and looped three of his own rhythm tracks and provided a chat over the top courtesy of himself and another MC, Charlie Ace ??? it even had a stolen section of a funky soul record, The Staple Singers??? ???This Old Town???, thrown in. But although its format and attitude was right, nobody called it a breaks record ??? it was just regarded as mad. Other than that, the breaks the early DJs used were many: ???Lowell Fulson???s
    ???Tramp??? and Rufus Thomas??? ???The Breakdown??? were among them, lurking funkily on this compilation./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=GREEN SCROLLAMOUNT=20> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT BGCOLOR=YELLOW>Breaks have been around since the 1970s ??? are there more to be discovered?

    Yes ??? any sound can be a break if it???s used with originality. There have been classical breaks, comedy breaks, African breaks, ragga breaks, raga breaks, breaks from bits of movies and TV shows. As long as it can be sampled and looped, it can be a break. It doesn???t even have to be music, as long as it has a beat. And there are tracks on this album that have barely been looped, but which deserve to be./MARQUEE>[/b]
    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT SCROLLAMOUNT=15 BGCOLOR=YELLOW>So what is a break?

    The word ???break??? is short for breakbeat. Meaning a short section of a record that can be looped on a sampler to create a longer, seamless piece of music from this one section./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=GREEN SCROLLAMOUNT=40> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=BLUE>Why is it called a break?

    The term derives from the ???breakdown???, a part of a funk or disco record where most or all of the other instruments drop away, leaving the drummer, or maybe the drummer and percussionist, or drummer and bassist, to play their parts unaccompanied. This provides an instant rhythm section to create a new tune from./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT SCROLLAMOUNT=15 BGCOLOR=GREEN>How did it start?

    As a reaction to the sterility of major-label disco music in the mid-1970s. As a necessity for survival, many black bands turned to playing disco. Although disco had a big black audience, there remained a hardcore of funkers who felt it didn???t reflect their ghetto experience. So DJs like Kool Herc and Grandmaster Flash in the South Bronx and Brooklyn began to create their own funky sound by looping up breakdowns on two decks. What was originally a novelty became popular at street level. Other DJs would talk over them, influenced by reggae toasters (many early rappers had a Caribbean heritage, even if they were born in America themselves) and rap was born./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE BGCOLOR=YELLOW SCROLLAMOUNT=30> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=BLUE>What was the first break?

    That???s a moot point. James Brown put together a couple of records credited to ???Steve Soul??? in the early 1970s, which were basically edits of many of his records with an announcer talking over them. But the beat was by no means seamless. In 1973 Lee Perry created the first true hip-hop record, albeit with a reggae rhythm, when he edited and looped three of his own rhythm tracks and provided a chat over the top courtesy of himself and another MC, Charlie Ace ??? it even had a stolen section of a funky soul record, The Staple Singers??? ???This Old Town???, thrown in. But although its format and attitude was right, nobody called it a breaks record ??? it was just regarded as mad. Other than that, the breaks the early DJs used were many: ???Lowell Fulson???s
    ???Tramp??? and Rufus Thomas??? ???The Breakdown??? were among them, lurking funkily on this compilation./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=GREEN SCROLLAMOUNT=20> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT BGCOLOR=YELLOW>Breaks have been around since the 1970s ??? are there more to be discovered?

    Yes ??? any sound can be a break if it???s used with originality. There have been classical breaks, comedy breaks, African breaks, ragga breaks, raga breaks, breaks from bits of movies and TV shows. As long as it can be sampled and looped, it can be a break. It doesn???t even have to be music, as long as it has a beat. And there are tracks on this album that have barely been looped, but which deserve to be./MARQUEE>[/b]
    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT SCROLLAMOUNT=15 BGCOLOR=YELLOW>So what is a break?

    The word ???break??? is short for breakbeat. Meaning a short section of a record that can be looped on a sampler to create a longer, seamless piece of music from this one section./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=GREEN SCROLLAMOUNT=40> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=BLUE>Why is it called a break?

    The term derives from the ???breakdown???, a part of a funk or disco record where most or all of the other instruments drop away, leaving the drummer, or maybe the drummer and percussionist, or drummer and bassist, to play their parts unaccompanied. This provides an instant rhythm section to create a new tune from./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT SCROLLAMOUNT=15 BGCOLOR=GREEN>How did it start?

    As a reaction to the sterility of major-label disco music in the mid-1970s. As a necessity for survival, many black bands turned to playing disco. Although disco had a big black audience, there remained a hardcore of funkers who felt it didn???t reflect their ghetto experience. So DJs like Kool Herc and Grandmaster Flash in the South Bronx and B rooklyn began to create their own funky sound by looping up breakdowns on two decks. What was originally a novelty became popular at street level. Other DJs would talk over them, influenced by reggae toasters (many early rappers had a Caribbean heritage, even if they were born in America themselves) and rap was born./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE BGCOLOR=YELLOW SCROLLAMOUNT=30> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=BLUE>What was the first break?

    That???s a moot point. James Brown put together a couple of records credited to ???Steve Soul??? in the early 1970s, which were basically edits of many of his records with an announcer talking over them. But the beat was by no means seamless. In 1973 Lee Perry created the first true hip-hop record, albeit with a reggae rhythm, when he edited and looped three of his own rhythm tracks and provided a chat over the top courtesy of himself and another MC, Charlie Ace ??? it even had a stolen section of a funky soul record, The Staple Singers??? ???This Old Town???, thrown in. But although its format and attitude was right, nobody called it a breaks record ??? it was just regarded as mad. Other than that, the breaks the early DJs used were many: ???Lowell Fulson???s
    ???Tramp??? and Rufus Thomas??? ???The Breakdown??? were among them, lurking funkily on this compilation./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=GREEN SCROLLAMOUNT=20> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT BGCOLOR=YELLOW>Breaks have been around since the 1970s ??? are there more to be discovered?

    Yes ??? any sound can be a break if it???s used with originality. There have been classical breaks, comedy breaks, African breaks, ragga breaks, raga breaks, breaks from bits of movies and TV shows. As long as it can be sampled and looped, it can be a break. It doesn???t even have to be music, as long as it has a beat. And there are tracks on this album that have barely been looped, but which deserve to be./MARQUEE>[/b]
    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT SCROLLAMOUNT=15 BGCOLOR=YELLOW>So what is a break?

    The word ???break??? is short for breakbeat. Meaning a short section of a record that can be looped on a sampler to create a longer, seamless piece of music from this one section./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=GREEN SCROLLAMOUNT=40> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=BLUE>Why is it called a break?

    The term derives from the ???breakdown???, a part of a funk or disco record where most or all of the other instruments drop away, leaving the drummer, or maybe the drummer and percussionist, or drummer and bassist, to play their parts unaccompanied. This provides an instant rhythm section to create a new tune from./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT SCROLLAMOUNT=15 BGCOLOR=GREEN>How did it start?

    As a reaction to the sterility of major-label disco music in the mid-1970s. As a necessity for survival, many black bands turned to playing disco. Although disco had a big black audience, there remained a hardcore of funkers who felt it didn???t reflect their ghetto experience. So DJs like Kool Herc and Grandmaster Flash in the South Bronx and Brooklyn began to create their own funky sound by looping up breakdowns on two decks. What was originally a novelty became popular at street level. Other DJs would talk over them, influenced by reggae toasters (many early rappers had a Caribbean heritage, even if they were born in America themselves) and rap was born./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE BGCOLOR=YELLOW SCROLLAMOUNT=30> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=BLUE>What was the first break?

    That???s a moot point. James Brown put together a couple of records credited to ???Steve Soul??? in the early 1970s, which were basically edits of many of his records with an announcer talking over them. But the beat was by no means seamless. In 1973 Lee Perry created the first true hip-hop record, albeit with a reggae rhythm, when he edited and looped three of his own rhythm tracks and provided a chat over the top courtesy of himself and another MC, Charlie Ace ??? it even had a stolen section of a funky soul record, The Staple Singers??? ???This Old Town???, thrown in. But although its format and attitude was right, nobody called it a breaks record ??? it was just regarded as mad. Other than that, the breaks the early DJs used were many: ???Lowell Fulson???s
    ???Tramp??? and Rufus Thomas??? ???The Breakdown??? were among them, lurking funkily on this compilation./MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=RIGHT BGCOLOR=GREEN SCROLLAMOUNT=20> /MARQUEE>

    MARQUEE DIRECTION=LEFT BGCOLOR=YELLOW>Breaks have been around since the 1970s ??? are there more to be discovered?

    Yes ??? any sound can be a break if it???s used with originality. There have been classical breaks, comedy breaks, African breaks, ragga breaks, raga breaks, breaks from bits of movies and TV shows. As long as it can be sampled and looped, it can be a break. It doesn???t even have to be music, as long as it has a beat. And there are tracks on this album that have barely been looped, but which deserve to be./MARQUEE>[/b]

  • DORDOR Two Ron Toe 9,900 Posts
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