The psychological struggle of the urge to grip vs. the need for a healthy space

The BizarreThe Bizarre San Francisco, CA 20 Posts
I know this has been covered here multiple times in the past, but it's an ongoing struggle for me and I'm sure there are others who can relate. I'm hoping there's someone here who has experienced the psychological shift needed to adjust their digging and hoarding habits into a healthier practice and maybe impart some wisdom on us.

I keep digging and amassing more records. My interest in exploring different sub-genres, discovering new labels, obscure artists, who played on what record when and why, where the next oddball sample I can flip that nobody cares about or will notice will come from, where the next garage sale score will be, what library records might be lurking in a storage unit somewhere within driving distance from me at any given moment is at a constant PEAK. I just never get tired of this shit. I love learning more and more and finding and collecting more and more records and there seems to be no end in sight. I've actually picked up a part time job once a week working at a record store and am getting paid mostly in records (GOOD ones - It's sort of amazing). It's clear that this will remain a life-long obsession.  

There is a lot of reasoning behind my digging habits; I'm a DJ and spin almost exclusively vinyl, I'm a producer/beatmaker and primarily source sounds by sampling records, I love learning about and discovering new music, and I really just love being physically surrounded by a large collection of music. Does any of this justify the obsessive gripping? Yes and no. 
 
My wife is incredibly patient with me in regards to the collection despite the fact that I surpassed maximum capacity a couple years ago. We have a 2 bedroom apt and the larger of the 2 bedrooms is dedicated to records and studio equipment. It's getting hard to walk in there. Shelves are full, there are stacks of crates where there shouldn't be and none of the lower shelves are accessible because of the huge stacks of LPs in front of them. I'm not sure the number. I think I'm maybe between 2 or 3000 now. It really doesn't matter though because it's just too much for the space.

Somethings gotta give. I either need to fork out for a storage space (which I can't really afford right now) or start getting rid of some of this stockpile. What I'm realizing needs to really change is my attitude about the records and the collection. The gripper mentality is such a powerful persuasion it is hard to resist. I really need to accept that I don't need to hold onto everything forever and develop a practice of "acquire, utilize, and release." This might sound easy and simple, but it's not.

 HOW DO I STOP GRIPPING ALL THESE RECORDS??
SPlDEYtrzakhstanBeatnick Dee

  Comments


  • para11axpara11ax No-style-havin' mf'er 321 Posts
    I think the answer is partly found in your thread title: seek counseling my friend. It has been said that those who collect obsessively seek to fill a void in their lives, and one that they are often unaware of. Talking to a pro will help you understand yourself better.

    Your vinyl obsession (if I can call it that) is literally taking over your life. If you are happy and not causing harm, then do what feels right and keep on keeing on. But it sounds to me like you're concerned. You sound like you've hit a critical juncture where you're questioning the end-game, and that suggests to me that you should seek help.


    SPlDEYDuderonomy

  • The BizarreThe Bizarre San Francisco, CA 20 Posts
    "Your vinyl obsession (if I can call it that) is literally taking over your life. "

    Man this thread turned depressing quickly. I would not say I'm quite on that level, but I think there's some valid advice to be had here. Appreciate it. I'm definitely concerned and looking to adjust things a bit. As for seeking out council from professionals... I did post this on the Strut, no? 
    Duderonomy

  • jjfad027jjfad027 1,589 Posts
    I started selling records (in the east bay) via a couple sidewalk sales in the past couple years and it's been as much fun selling them as it was to find them. It's a sellers market right now. At least in the bay. Start slangin.
    The Bizarre

  • RhythmGJRhythmGJ Buffalo, NY 76 Posts

    Yeah, there are lots of ways "out of this," if that's what you want/need. But really? what's wrong with it? There are far worse habits to have and things to enjoy that are much, much worse for you and everybody else. If it's a space consideration, sell some stuff (cheap, to me), and then buy some more. Rotate stock. Find inexpensive storage. Buy a shed. Get into a co-op with somebody (I rent a studio that is for now, shared with two others). But really, why should you let anything go? It's not a problem unless it's a problem (you haven't spent rent or food money on records, have you?)...

    GJ


  • DuderonomyDuderonomy Haut de la Garenne 6,814 Posts
    Give records to fellow travellers/friends.

    They get a good home, and if you every need to borrow, record etc it's spreading your resources.
    The Bizarre

  • Am I sick if I say 3000 records doesn't even seem like a lot?
    The Bizarre

  • Am I sick if I say 3000 records doesn't even seem like a lot?
    Okay, I mean I know it's a lot, relatively speaking. but after years of purging I still have that many.  It's livable.  

  • ppadilhappadilha 1,808 Posts
    jjfad027 said:
    I started selling records (in the east bay) via a couple sidewalk sales in the past couple years and it's been as much fun selling them as it was to find them. It's a sellers market right now. At least in the bay. Start slangin.
    I'd do this.

    there is pleasure in purging too, not just hoarding.

    I always have a pile of stuff to sell/trade, and another pile of things to get rid of by any means necessary (basically the cheapies I pick up on the chance they might have something decent but don't), even if it means basically donating to the local thrift store in exchange for a discount on other records I pick up. Have fun passing on records to other people or trading up for raers.
    The Bizarre

  • SPlDEYSPlDEY Vegas 3,135 Posts
    I sold half my records, because I was running out of space. I gave away many just as gifts to friends. I just decided I don't need to keep obsessing over buying records anymore. There's only really a handful of records that I will never sell, but I know that my family won't know what to do with them when I'm dead. I think about this more lately when I feel like buying records I can't afford. 

    - spidey
    The Bizarre
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