I never liked the BEASTIE BOYS

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  • TREWTREW 2,037 Posts


    oh and too the dude who mentioned they should do a remix album, I got some whitelabel uk import a few years ago that is all remixes. Some good large pro beats and a lot of other dope remixes.

    yeah those Large P remixes are worth hunting down, in fact every 12" off Ill Commune has an iller than ill reup.. there's a buckwild remix that'll melt your face (complete w/ eddie fisher loopola)

  • beasties are hip hop made by white dudes for white dudes. years ago that is all remixes. Some


    maybe after lit. when lit dropped, around my way....every cat i knew that was gang related was bumpin that shit like no tomorrow. paul revere was massive in the hood.
    needless to say both of beasties 1st and 2nd lps changed the game.


    1st time i ever took acid, pauls boutique was the soundtrack. how fitting. double hit blotter from m.i.t.
    with eggman, shadrach, blasting...shit was nutz.

  • akoako 3,409 Posts
    i love the beastie boys. dont really care for the first album and the new one sucked, but everything inbetween in excellent.

    ANYWAY

    what im wondering. everybody loves pauls boutique on this thread it seems and says how important it is...but just think how much MORE important it would have been if the dust bros. released their solo album?! i wanna see how history would have changed if this happened instead....not to say it would have had an immediate impact, but still, cmon. guiness says "endtroducing" was the first instrumental hip-hop album, and that, although probably not even close to accurate, was still 7 years after pauls boutique came out.....

  • bull_oxbull_ox 5,056 Posts
    faux rillz... don't you usually base your hip-hop comments on how many copies a record sells??? can't you at least admit that for years the beastie boys had the highest selling hip-hop album in history? i'm not mad at you for not liking their music... but why wouldn't your soundscan theories apply here as well?

    Eh, I think Reynaldo was the only one who ever subscribed to that theory... I know for a fact faux listens to rap FAR more obscure than the so-called 'underground' artists championed by some on here...

  • what has happened to mike d? it looks like he has aged about 30 years in the past little while.

    Vegetarianism methinks.



    umm.. I doubt it. I dont think I've ever met a vegetarian who looks dramatically older than he/she really is. generally, i would say the opposite is true.
    just check out phonic's boyish good looks if you dont believe me.




    and yeah, cosign on the beasties up till the last one.


  • what im wondering. everybody loves pauls boutique on this thread it seems and says how important it is...but just think how much MORE important it would have been if the dust bros. released their solo album?! i wanna see how history would have changed if this happened instead....not to say it would have had an immediate impact, but still, cmon. guiness says "endtroducing" was the first instrumental hip-hop album, and that, although probably not even close to accurate, was still 7 years after pauls boutique came out.....


    Honestly, if it had just come out as a Dust Brothers solo album I don't think the album would have had nearly the impact. Not that the music wouldn't have been good, and not that there wouldn't be people to this day proclaiming it a classic, but I view the Beasties/Dust Bros. hookup as helpful for both sides. At the time Paul's Boutique came out the Beasties were still pretty much the biggest name in hiphop going. Everybody was waiting to see how they'd follow up their debut album. At the time the Dust Brothers were also doing fairly well for themselves, what with producing Tone Loc and Young MC, but they weren't household names or anything. Certainly at the time working with the Beasties was a step up for them since they would be responsible for the follow-up to the (at the time) biggest hiphop album ever. It was a beneficial relationship for both parties. I don't care if people in here complain about how much they hate the Beasties, at the time they were the biggest hiphop group going so why wouldn't the Dust Brothers want to work with them?

    Obviously, "Paul's Boutique" ended up being a bit too ahead of its time and avant-garde because the 4 million people who bought "Licensed To Ill" didn't show up when "Paul's Boutique" dropped. It only reached gold status initially. Now, if the album having the hottest rap group at the time didn't cause the music to sell I don't really see how the album as an instrumental album would've made much of an impact. I mean, there were other producer-based things at the time too and they never had very much of an impact commercially either. All of us music nerds know of Coldcut but because they were doing instrumental-based music they're not really known to anybody but us nerds. Had the Dust Brothers just released the instrumental album at the time it'd probably be recognized by some of us for its groundbreaking nature but I doubt it'd be as engrained into the hiphop psyche as "Paul's Boutique" is.

    If the Dust Brothers hadn't worked with the Beasties who knows how different their careers might have been? Working with the Beasties certainly gave them a high profile and likely enabled them to work with artists of their choosing. If they hadn't worked with the Beasties there's no way of saying they'd have become nearly as well-known and successful in the ensuing years. Instead of becoming the high-profile producers they did become they might've stayed more underground and semi-obscure. And I'm sure some people might have preferred it that way.

  • DocMcCoyDocMcCoy "Go and laugh in your own country!" 5,921 Posts

    I was gonna post about a Deluxe version of License To Ill. Wondering if they had enuff extra material to add to the OG. How's the sound quality of this OG-ILL? DEF JAM should deluxe this joint.

    From what I've heard there won't be a reissue of that (or Paul's Boutique, or a whole host of other old school classics) due to the cost of clearing samples. If they re-release the album with bonus tracks I've heard it's basically considered a new release so they'd have to get sample clearance for everything on the album. They didn't really have to bother with it the first time around, but these days everybody's hip to the game and there's no way they'd get the clearances, at least not without spending tons of money. I don't know if opinions have changed in the 20 years since the album dropped but I distinctly remember Steve Miller wasn't too fond of his music being used by the Beasties (or other artists in general). The Led Zeppelin guys weren't too keen on their stuff being sampled at the time, but times have changed and Jimmy Page let Puff Daddy sample "Kashmir", for christ's sake, so who knows if they'd be game to allow a clearance. Even if they would I imagine the cost of clearing a Zeppelin sample would be insanely high. So basically, don't hold your breath waiting for a remaster/reissue of this album...and certainly not of Paul's Boutique. I would imagine that album would probably have the highest cost for sample clearances of any album ever because it's just chock full of them.

    Would a re-mastered upgrade fall into the same catagory?

    Yes, probably. If it had a different catalogue number, it'd be considered a new release, and the statute of limitations for copyright infringement would kick in from the date of that release, as it would constitute what's called "secondary exploitation". Run-DMC are being currently being sued by the surviving members of The Knack on just such a basis over "It's Tricky" and its "My Sharona" sample, because "Raising Hell" was reissued a couple of years ago on another label.

    I can confirm that a whole grip of Def Jam albums will never get the remastered/expanded treatment for precisely the reasons Tuff Gong outlines above. I've heard this first-hand from someone in Universal's Catalogue Marketing department. The albums themselves will probably stay on the catalogue forever, but the full-scale reissue treatment? Forget it.

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts

    what im wondering. everybody loves pauls boutique on this thread it seems and says how important it is...but just think how much MORE important it would have been if the dust bros. released their solo album?! i wanna see how history would have changed if this happened instead....not to say it would have had an immediate impact, but still, cmon. guiness says "endtroducing" was the first instrumental hip-hop album, and that, although probably not even close to accurate, was still 7 years after pauls boutique came out.....


    Honestly, if it had just come out as a Dust Brothers solo album I don't think the album would have had nearly the impact. Not that the music wouldn't have been good, and not that there wouldn't be people to this day proclaiming it a classic, but I view the Beasties/Dust Bros. hookup as helpful for both sides. At the time Paul's Boutique came out the Beasties were still pretty much the biggest name in hiphop going. Everybody was waiting to see how they'd follow up their debut album. At the time the Dust Brothers were also doing fairly well for themselves, what with producing Tone Loc and Young MC, but they weren't household names or anything. Certainly at the time working with the Beasties was a step up for them since they would be responsible for the follow-up to the (at the time) biggest hiphop album ever. It was a beneficial relationship for both parties. I don't care if people in here complain about how much they hate the Beasties, at the time they were the biggest hiphop group going so why wouldn't the Dust Brothers want to work with them?

    Obviously, "Paul's Boutique" ended up being a bit too ahead of its time and avant-garde because the 4 million people who bought "Licensed To Ill" didn't show up when "Paul's Boutique" dropped. It only reached gold status initially. Now, if the album having the hottest rap group at the time didn't cause the music to sell I don't really see how the album as an instrumental album would've made much of an impact. I mean, there were other producer-based things at the time too and they never had very much of an impact commercially either. All of us music nerds know of Coldcut but because they were doing instrumental-based music they're not really known to anybody but us nerds. Had the Dust Brothers just released the instrumental album at the time it'd probably be recognized by some of us for its groundbreaking nature but I doubt it'd be as engrained into the hiphop psyche as "Paul's Boutique" is.

    Obviously they werent "the hottest group in HIP HOP at the time" judging by the sales of PB. The numbers dont tell the whole story. By the time PB dropped De La Soul & them entered the game. Now if u werent buying or paying any real attention to Hip Hop, PB was released during a highly creative time in the game.
    Stezo came out that year. And not even gonna bring up Public Enemy. The climate had changed.

  • jaymackjaymack 5,198 Posts
    batmon,
    whats goin on in your avy?

  • batmonbatmon 27,574 Posts
    batmon,
    whats goin on in your avy?



    I dont know?

  • eliseelise 3,252 Posts
    batmon,
    whats goin on in your avy?



    I dont know?

    they're sooo hot..



  • jaymackjaymack 5,198 Posts
    its very hypnotizing.
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